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General Category => Huh? => Topic started by: Davep on July 19, 2017, 1720 UTC

Title: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Davep on July 19, 2017, 1720 UTC
I would like to share this with the idea that it may inspire others, and brag. Wildlife is on the run these days, so my wife and I do hands on activist projects instead of just moaning about it.
I chose to raise butterflies after reading about the demise of the Monarch due to loss of wintering habitat and poisoning of host plants made available by chem giants Monsanto and others ( whole nuther story)
Anyway, I documented Polyxenes " Johnny Walker"  ( #4 this year , brothers Black and Red and Snorky Jr since July 15) . In 2016 I released a total of 22.
Eggs hatched 7/18/17 and there are 13 in this gen 2
In the wild predators consume 90% Rearing increases to 80_ 100%survival

I keep them in specialized equipment - a Chinese food tray and later a hermit crab cage.
You have to gather the anise every day . The 22 I raised last year consumed the entire plant, causing a shortage with the 4 th gen. I have 2 additional food plants this year

Black Swallowtails aren't threatened and we have planted Milkweed for Monarchs, so it would have a more direct effect, but sadly their numbers are low and we've only seen 2 in the area this year. In the future and this year we still hope one will find our plants and glorify our efforts.

 This page edited 6/21/18 for videos that no longer exist


Thanks for reading
 Davep
Title: Re: Papilio Proxenes
Post by: MDK2 on July 19, 2017, 1807 UTC
Very cool Dave.
Title: Re: Papilio Proxenes
Post by: Ct Yankee on July 19, 2017, 2248 UTC
My wife and I also are very much pro-butterfly.  While we do not hatch our own, we don't use any pesticides in the garden or on the lawn.  We allow native weeds to grow and flower in sections, including milkweed and wild thyme. We also grow a half dozen types of fruit and numerous flowers they favor.  We must have 8-12 (various swallowtails, skippers, and fritillaries) varieties that visit our property, saw the first Monarch of the year yesterday - was it yours, Davep  ;D?  Nice work, sir! 
Title: Re: Papilio Proxenes
Post by: Fansome on July 20, 2017, 0017 UTC
If you happen to be in the area, this is a must-see:

https://www.floridamuseum.ufl.edu/exhibits/butterfly-rainforest/
Title: Re: Papilio Proxenes
Post by: ChrisSmolinski on July 20, 2017, 2029 UTC
Very nice indeed. I plant a wildflower meadow each year, and always put in one of the "butterflies and pollinator" mixes. I also have an area of milkweed that I allow to re-grow each year.
Title: Re: Papilio Proxenes
Post by: Davep on July 21, 2017, 0548 UTC
Glad to hear of everyone's efforts!

Two more flew away this am


Title: Re: Papilio Proxenes
Post by: Josh on July 21, 2017, 1749 UTC
I ate a few Monarchs in crysalis today, makes for a delightfully crunchy coating to a juicy center!
Title: Re: Papilio Proxenes
Post by: Ct Yankee on July 21, 2017, 1816 UTC
...with fava beans and a nice chianti, I presume.  ;)

Two monarchs here today, no apparent bite marks.
Title: Re: Papilio Proxenes
Post by: Davep on July 22, 2017, 0102 UTC
Thanks CT Yankee  I love it.  I'll name one for you
Title: Re: Papilio Proxenes
Post by: Pigmeat on July 22, 2017, 0825 UTC
I ate a few Monarchs in crysalis today, makes for a delightfully crunchy coating to a juicy center!

How did I know that was coming?

Title: Re: Papilio Proxenes
Post by: John Poet on July 22, 2017, 1044 UTC
"The monarch will be crowned."

Title: Re: Papilio Proxenes
Post by: Josh on July 22, 2017, 1641 UTC
I ate a few Monarchs in crysalis today, makes for a delightfully crunchy coating to a juicy center!

How did I know that was coming?



They're chitiny good!
Title: Re: Papilio Proxenes
Post by: Davep on July 23, 2017, 0406 UTC

The last fly of the batch, "Cordell Walker" took off Sat
It will be about 16 days before the next event.  
I believe some of them have remained or visit the yard , I can't be sure but it doesn't take long to spot one now.




Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Davep on August 02, 2017, 1841 UTC
(https://i.imgur.com/JLO9Or8.jpg)

The second batch in which there were initially 15, has dwindled to 4 +1 new.
I cannot be sure what caused the die off. They were healthy when collected and
became belly up 1 or 2 a day. Of the 4 survivors , one is chrysalis and the others are ready.
No way I can be sure, there are all sorts of things but clues are pesticide or herbicide on the plant from the neighbors ( seen) or the Mosquito truck ( not seen).  

A new batch is on the plants now and it has rained since.
Putting me behind compared to last year at this time
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Ct Yankee on August 02, 2017, 2113 UTC

I have 5 caterpillars crawling about my Chinese food take out box at the moment loving my homegrown milkweed.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Davep on August 03, 2017, 0141 UTC
Good on ya !  You don't have to use the Chinese :D , it's just I get a double from recycling.  Keep us posted .  
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Pigmeat on August 03, 2017, 1553 UTC
When I was in fourth grade we had a science project on praying mantises. It was sponsored by the state dept of Agriculture. We were sent out gather mantis egg cases off plants and hatch them out in the spring. The cases were left in boxes in a closed, unused, unheated classroom until the spring when we would bring them into our room at higher temps to hatch out and open in terrariums.

As that was the last year the school was to be open, the school was being serviced by rotating maintenance men and janitors as the former janitor had retired the spring before. They came in a few days before Christmas break was over to fire up the boiler and turn on the heat. They turned the heat on to ALL the rooms. When the cooks and teachers came in bright and early on the first day of the second semester, there were mantises all over that school. They had to call in the exterminators. We got an extra week off until the building was declared insecticide free after a good airing out.

It didn't do a lot of good, we were still catching mantises until they shut the place down in June.

Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: redhat on August 04, 2017, 0554 UTC
While driving through South Dakota a few weeks back, I noted a LOT of butterflies, many appeared to be monarchs fluttering about the winds.  The downside, a lot of them wound up on the windshield :(  I don't recall seeing so many of them in the past.  Maybe its weather related, but they seemed to be endless for the better part of 200 miles.

+-RH
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Davep on August 05, 2017, 1324 UTC
Thanks for the report Redhat!

Here's the latest threat from the current administration.
https://www.texasobserver.org/national-butterfly-center-staff-surprised-by-workers-with-chainsaws-prepping-trumps-border-wall/

http://www.nbcnews.com/news/latino/border-wall-push-creates-flap-house-national-butterfly-center-n786241
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Josh on August 05, 2017, 1732 UTC
1. The other day I was going to work and as I was getting into the car I noticed a wasp atop a mantis, I was thinking wasps don't hump mantis do they so wtf is going on? The wasp had apparently stung said mantis and was eating it from the rear end forward while the mantis feebly tried to stop the proceedings. Insects have no compassion.

2. The other other day I was getting into the car and had picked up a hitch hiker, a little green baby mantis rode along to work, at hiway speeds, on the open window sill. I named it "Spencer". I suspect the mantis are in the tree I sometimes park under.

3. Does anyone have a recipe to take the bitterness out of mature monarchs? The milkweed diet makes them tangy.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Pigmeat on August 06, 2017, 0057 UTC
1. The other day I was going to work and as I was getting into the car I noticed a wasp atop a mantis, I was thinking wasps don't hump mantis do they so wtf is going on? The wasp had apparently stung said mantis and was eating it from the rear end forward while the mantis feebly tried to stop the proceedings. Insects have no compassion.

2. The other other day I was getting into the car and had picked up a hitch hiker, a little green baby mantis rode along to work, at hiway speeds, on the open window sill. I named it "Spencer". I suspect the mantis are in the tree I sometimes park under.

3. Does anyone have a recipe to take the bitterness out of mature monarchs? The milkweed diet makes them tangy.

Wasp venom liquefies other insects from the inside out. The wasp was eating the tasty goo filling.

I had large monarch go by when I was out picking peppers this afternoon. I've seen a bunch of them over the past couple of weeks working on my wife's flowers and the neighbors hummingbird feeders, but they couldn't hold a candle when it comes to the  size to the one I saw today. The black-eyed Susan's really seem to draw them in and the honeysuckle blossoms keep them around.

I'd cut the honeysuckle vines, but Al ties them to his ankles to land dive from the top of the beech tree when he visits. It's his people's customary sport. When explorers rediscovered him in New Guinea he was All Island champ. He still tries to claim he's Michael Rockefeller, but that's another story.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Josh on August 07, 2017, 1835 UTC
Is Mike the one who died humping a hooker?
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: ChrisSmolinski on August 07, 2017, 1846 UTC
We have lots of moth caterpillars on the milkweed this year, but unfortunately I have not seen any Monarch caterpillars yet. We had quite a few last year.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Pigmeat on August 08, 2017, 0326 UTC
Is Mike the one who died humping a hooker?

Nah, that was Mike's Dad. Mike went off to collect tribal art in New Guinea on the Asmat Coast in the very early '60's after college. One of the trade items he brought with him on his trips were steel axes, the Asmat tribes were still using stone for tools and weapon. The people of the Asmat he traded with and observed, were involved in frequent conflicts neighbors, and longtime headhunters for centuries. They quickly put them to work in full scale tribal warfare against their neighbors, destabilizing the entire coast.

On his last trip to the coast, he and a friend built a makeshift motorized double outrigger from oil drums, mounting a motor on it. They ran into engine trouble on their way to their destination and started drifting away from the coast. Rockefeller decided to swim for the shore as he was strong swimmer. His friend stay aboard, feeling they had their best chance sticking with the boat. The friend was found the next day by fishermen, Rockefeller was never seen again, despite an extensive search by both the Dutch govt. who held that part of New Guinea, and another financed by the family.

As near as anyone can tell, he either drowned, or was killed, according to several local men who year's later gave an account of finding him on the coast. There was a misunderstanding between Rockefeller and the men, neither being able to communicate with one another. When Rockefeller made a sudden unexpected move, one of the men ran him through with a spear. It didn't kill him, cooler heads prevailed, and they decided to take him back to their camp. He died on the way, according to this account.

When the men got to the camp with the body, they caught word of a massive search going on for a White guy along the coast, and knew they were in for it when if it was found they had killed the fellow. They had to get rid of the body and decided the best way would be to get rid of him in a traditional way. So they ate him.

However, there are nearly as many theories about the disappearance of Michael Rockefeller as their are about the assassination of JFK. Read about them, a Google search will get you started, and pick your poison. I just like the latter of the above two because there was sensationalist article making the rounds in my teens titled, "Is This The Man Who Ate Michael Rockefeller?", with a picture of the supposed diner with a spear in a traditional headdress. Seeing that pic was a real, "Screw with a Melanesian, become long-pig." moment. lol.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Fansome on August 08, 2017, 0424 UTC
I guess he disagreed with something, and it ate him.

Is Mike the one who died humping a hooker?

Nah, that was Mike's Dad. Mike went off to collect tribal art in New Guinea on the Asmat Coast in the very early '60's after college. One of the trade items he brought with him on his trips were steel axes, the Asmat tribes were still using stone for tools and weapon. The people of the Asmat he traded with and observed, were involved in frequent conflicts neighbors, and longtime headhunters for centuries. They quickly put them to work in full scale tribal warfare against their neighbors, destabilizing the entire coast.

On his last trip to the coast, he and a friend built a makeshift motorized double outrigger from oil drums, mounting a motor on it. They ran into engine trouble on their way to their destination and started drifting away from the coast. Rockefeller decided to swim for the shore as he was strong swimmer. His friend stay aboard, feeling they had their best chance sticking with the boat. The friend was found the next day by fishermen, Rockefeller was never seen again, despite an extensive search by both the Dutch govt. who held that part of New Guinea, and another financed by the family.

As near as anyone can tell, he either drowned, or was killed, according to several local men who year's later gave an account of finding him on the coast. There was a misunderstanding between Rockefeller and the men, neither being able to communicate with one another. When Rockefeller made a sudden unexpected move, one of the men ran him through with a spear. It didn't kill him, cooler heads prevailed, and they decided to take him back to their camp. He died on the way, according to this account.

When the men got to the camp with the body, they caught word of a massive search going on for a White guy along the coast, and knew they were in for it when if it was found they had killed the fellow. They had to get rid of the body and decided the best way would be to get rid of him in a traditional way. So they ate him.

However, there are nearly as many theories about the disappearance of Michael Rockefeller as their are about the assassination of JFK. Read about them, a Google search will get you started, and pick your poison. I just like the latter of the above two because there was sensationalist article making the rounds in my teens titled, "Is This The Man Who Ate Michael Rockefeller?", with a picture of the supposed diner with a spear in a traditional headdress. Seeing that pic was a real, "Screw with a Melanesian, become long-pig." moment. lol.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: MDK2 on August 08, 2017, 1405 UTC
According to the wikipedia article, they were 12 miles from shore. Strong swimmer or no, that's a marathon distance for someone who was probably a sprinter. People have a way of grossly underestimating distances like that. When I lived in Seattle, every now and then some swimmers would have to be rescued from their usually spontaneous decision to swim across Puget Sound. Sure, the other side looks close but the ferry to Bainbridge Island still takes 30 minutes to cross while motoring at an average speed of 16 knots.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Josh on August 08, 2017, 1756 UTC
I guess he disagreed with something, and it ate him.

Is Mike the one who died humping a hooker?

Nah, that was Mike's Dad. Mike went off to collect tribal art in New Guinea on the Asmat Coast in the very early '60's after college. One of the trade items he brought with him on his trips were steel axes, the Asmat tribes were still using stone for tools and weapon. The people of the Asmat he traded with and observed, were involved in frequent conflicts neighbors, and longtime headhunters for centuries. They quickly put them to work in full scale tribal warfare against their neighbors, destabilizing the entire coast.

On his last trip to the coast, he and a friend built a makeshift motorized double outrigger from oil drums, mounting a motor on it. They ran into engine trouble on their way to their destination and started drifting away from the coast. Rockefeller decided to swim for the shore as he was strong swimmer. His friend stay aboard, feeling they had their best chance sticking with the boat. The friend was found the next day by fishermen, Rockefeller was never seen again, despite an extensive search by both the Dutch govt. who held that part of New Guinea, and another financed by the family.

As near as anyone can tell, he either drowned, or was killed, according to several local men who year's later gave an account of finding him on the coast. There was a misunderstanding between Rockefeller and the men, neither being able to communicate with one another. When Rockefeller made a sudden unexpected move, one of the men ran him through with a spear. It didn't kill him, cooler heads prevailed, and they decided to take him back to their camp. He died on the way, according to this account.

When the men got to the camp with the body, they caught word of a massive search going on for a White guy along the coast, and knew they were in for it when if it was found they had killed the fellow. They had to get rid of the body and decided the best way would be to get rid of him in a traditional way. So they ate him.

However, there are nearly as many theories about the disappearance of Michael Rockefeller as their are about the assassination of JFK. Read about them, a Google search will get you started, and pick your poison. I just like the latter of the above two because there was sensationalist article making the rounds in my teens titled, "Is This The Man Who Ate Michael Rockefeller?", with a picture of the supposed diner with a spear in a traditional headdress. Seeing that pic was a real, "Screw with a Melanesian, become long-pig." moment. lol.


http://instantrimshot.com/
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Pigmeat on August 08, 2017, 2238 UTC
According to the wikipedia article, they were 12 miles from shore. Strong swimmer or no, that's a marathon distance for someone who was probably a sprinter. People have a way of grossly underestimating distances like that. When I lived in Seattle, every now and then some swimmers would have to be rescued from their usually spontaneous decision to swim across Puget Sound. Sure, the other side looks close but the ferry to Bainbridge Island still takes 30 minutes to cross while motoring at an average speed of 16 knots.

They were off the delta of a large regional tidal river when the engine conked out. He was likely swept out to sea when the tide went out. However, the idea of a Rockefeller heir being eaten by a bunch of guys with stone age technology after he'd inadvertently launched massive nearby tribal wars by introducing steel axes in his lust to outdo his father's collection of "primitive" art is just too good for me to let go.

Now back to butterflies.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: MDK2 on August 09, 2017, 0057 UTC
They were off the delta of a large regional tidal river when the engine conked out. He was likely swept out to sea when the tide went out. However, the idea of a Rockefeller heir being eaten by a bunch of guys with stone age technology after he'd inadvertently launched massive nearby tribal wars by introducing steel axes in his lust to outdo his father's collection of "primitive" art is just too good for me to let go.

Now back to butterflies.

It's a much better story, that's for sure. Almost O. Henry-esque in its irony.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Josh on August 09, 2017, 1807 UTC
I must admit I've only seen few monarchs but several of the blue ones that are I guess the blue equivalent to the monarch around these parts.
And the black and yellow ones. I suspect the monarchs have spread word that I find them a delicacy.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Davep on August 15, 2017, 1703 UTC
Swallowtail Black vs Hummingbird on my Zinnias .
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Xy9iUOLEIqo

Only one fly away since the initial post "Lars Ulrich" flew 8/14  , another 3 should fly within a few days
Eggs were laid over the past few days by the one in the video, and is seen checking out a another Anise behind the zinnias
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Pigmeat on August 15, 2017, 2212 UTC
Interesting. The Aztecs thought if you lived a good life you went to a paradise full of butterflies, hummingbirds, and lots of pulque to drink.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Davep on August 16, 2017, 1503 UTC
Aug 16
Today I found that 2 had emerged from chrysalis. These were of the batch that suffered low viability in the caterpillar stage as I had previously written of. They will not be flying any missions.
I suspect herbicide Roundup (TM) had contaminated the Anise host plants from a Neighboring property being landscaped by Sublime Toxic Gardens advertised as "respecting pollinators ".
While I respect this person as a hard worker, he was observed spraying copious amounts of Monsanto Roundup (tm) upwind from our property.
I cannot prove causation, although the symptoms do not fit any of the parasite or predator scenarios. Rather , a genetic defect or some failure during metamorphosis.
Please do not support use of this chemical or anyone that uses it, although it's difficult to, because at least some of the produce items in the market have been subject to its use.
Ironic this happened after my initial post,or maybe not but i digress. Thanks for reading.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=lyhXuoAOEjA

Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Josh on August 16, 2017, 1609 UTC
https://www.mnn.com/health/fitness-well-being/blogs/roundup-weed-killer-probably-carcinogenic


cough
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Ct Yankee on August 16, 2017, 2259 UTC


Sorry to hear about your possible Roundup kill off, just sinful.  But thanks to your original post and guidance, there are 10 chrysalises in my living room and 3 munching caterpillars.  I lost one caterpillar as it was beginning to hang to form a chrysalis.  Hopefully, everything else makes it - thanks for the inspiration.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Davep on August 17, 2017, 0358 UTC
That's really great CY  8)  And thankyou as well. Can't wait to hear of those guys in the air.

Everything is normal here now and I see some activity each day, and actually collected a few about an hour after my wrant.  We had 3 or 4 inches rain over a week so mother nature hosed down. There's a lot of activity out in the yard now so I stopped kicking over other people's trash cans.


Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Pigmeat on August 17, 2017, 1332 UTC
It's funny you mention that, Dave. Most of July was a drier than normal. It's been raining above normal since the end of the month and I'm seeing butterflies everywhere. I even got popped by a June Bug the other night, it's been years since that happened.

I'm seeing the full variety of local milkweeds for the first time in years along the local and county roads. I'm wondering if the DOH hasn't switched up on defoliants? Now if we could get CSX and N&W to fall in line. Railroad right of ways were always a huge suburban and urban milkweed and blackberry habitat. They resemble long stretches of 50-75 ft. wide gravel deserts on either side of the bed now and have for years. Butterfly, boy, and wino habitat wiped out by a bunch of suits that never had the privilege of growing up around the tracks.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Davep on August 17, 2017, 1623 UTC
Thanks for the report!
We drove out US 58 a few weeks ago and I noticed they had defoliated about 25 miles of roadside under power lines.  I saw one area that had drainage directly to the Nottaway River .  Either VDot or Dominion Power or a co op. I guess the instructions on the label are just suggestions .
We need to start raising hell about the spraying of wino and derelict habitat!
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Ct Yankee on August 17, 2017, 2111 UTC

Uh-oh, I just added up from my last email - 10 chrysalis/3 caterpillars, a BAKER'S Dozen.....shhhhhhh, don't tell Josh.  
Josh - Don't eat the brown acid chryslasis  ;)
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Josh on August 18, 2017, 1618 UTC
Since I suspect the recently grown buds on my head are going to be feelers, and pretty sure wings covered with a fine powder are morphing from my back, I need to cut back on the monarchs for a while.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Ct Yankee on August 21, 2017, 2032 UTC


The first two monarchs emerged today, two females. An amazing thing to watch, glad I took the day off to watch the eclipse.  My wife dubbed them "Shadow"  and "Sunshine".  Release tomorrow, when I expect another emergence.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Davep on August 21, 2017, 2117 UTC
Great news
CT Yankee's fly . Well done!
(https://i.imgur.com/INCEbNv.jpg)
 You're good people
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Davep on September 06, 2017, 1613 UTC
Finally seeing Monarchs on (apparently) southern migration.
I managed a video.  
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=BRcUp_4eBHc


This year has not been good compared to 2016 as far as my swallowtail factory.
TS 10 sent salt spray up into the yard and denuded portions of the garden, including the Anise plants and milkweed but not completely. This was a setback and caused another high cat mortality rate I guess when they consumed the coated plants. This is a natural problem specific to my location. So the takeaway is dipping all foliage in water first in the future. There are many hidden mysteries within nature, the more you dig in , the more questions you have.
Looks like less than 15 flyaways this year, but I accept that's how it goes.
Plenty of bugs spotted in the wild visiting this year, I'll take that.

Thanks to Connecticut Yankee for making the thread a success with his participation and hfunderground for the space and readers for their time.

Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: MDK2 on September 09, 2017, 0232 UTC
Thanks for sharing all this. It's been very interesting these past couple of months.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Fansome on September 21, 2017, 0439 UTC
http://rsos.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/4/9/170760
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Davep on September 21, 2017, 1433 UTC
Thanks Fansome, interesting data!
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Ct Yankee on September 21, 2017, 2116 UTC


Well, we had nice bookends to our releases - they started with a pair on the day of the eclipse and ended on our 35th anniversary (9/18).  All total 11 releases - 9 females, 2 males.  All initially headed off in a northerly direction.  I mentioned the monarch release to acquaintances, at least four others said they did likewise.  Out of coincidence, the Discovery Tent at the Durham Fair is doing a weekend long education session on monarchs.

http://www.durhamfair.com/schedule/
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Davep on June 20, 2018, 1610 UTC
2018
We now have Two Black Swallowtails caterpillars collected , one went into chrysalis 6/15/18 .  We should have more. Last year was the neighbors use of pesticide, this year a family of Thrashers has built a nest near the host plants ,and proceeded to consume all but the 2 rescued. We observed the Trasher offspring on the ground Tuesday, hopefully they will leave soon.
Looking forward to this year , although a generation has been consumed already, it's nature's way and provided nutrition for the fledglings.
As a side note , a non captive Swallowtail had his wing partially severed last week by the Thrashers and found on the sidewalk alive.
Luckily I had spare parts from another ST found dead in the same area earlier and successfully repaired the wing with contact cement and was thrilled when it flew away with its new wing. From now on I will keep spare wings for such an occasion in the future . Some of you may deem this overboard. That's ok.I agree

Hopefully CT Yankee will enjoy success with his Monarchs like last year.   
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Josh on June 20, 2018, 1634 UTC
Awesome job on the airframe and powerplant work there.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Ct Yankee on June 20, 2018, 1827 UTC


I have a small army of black swallowtail caterpillars munching away at fennel in my yard.  I think the first few are about to go to chrysalis.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Davep on June 20, 2018, 2022 UTC
Here are the wing repair instructions. If you need a Karma reload.
https://www.livemonarch.com/hospital/
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: SevenTrees' on June 21, 2018, 0806 UTC
Cool Stuff Dave!!! I have a few Monarchs around, also Honey Bees.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Davep on June 21, 2018, 1403 UTC
Thanks for reading 7 Trees!      8)
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Pigmeat on June 22, 2018, 1600 UTC
I haven't seen any monarchs yet but the black swallowtails are everywhere. I haven't seen the amount of milkweed growing like we've had this year since the early-80's, that should pump up butterfly numbers.

Now if we could only bring back the noble June bug.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Davep on June 22, 2018, 1822 UTC
What happened to the JBs anyway? 


Thanks for the report!
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Josh on June 22, 2018, 2108 UTC
Last I knew, Des Moines Ia is very popular with the JBs.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Davep on July 26, 2018, 1922 UTC
Finally after 2 years we have Monarchs laying eggs in our yard !
 https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=wZSrhfV0sUw

Also here is another video of , I think this is a pipevine Swallowtail making a deposit.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Nw5yMwogtDc
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: MDK2 on July 26, 2018, 2226 UTC
Finally after 2 years we have Monarchs laying eggs in our yard !
 https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=wZSrhfV0sUw

Also here is another video of , I think this is a pipevine Swallowtail making a deposit.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Nw5yMwogtDc

Great!
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: ChrisSmolinski on August 09, 2018, 2226 UTC
I just saw a Monarch flying around the Crossed Parallel Loop antenna. I've allowed the various wild milkweeds to grow around the edges of the yard as usual, I'll have to check them for caterpillars.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Davep on August 09, 2018, 2313 UTC
Thanks Chris!
I have 5 monarch caterpillars now . It took two years of believing if you build it, they will come. Very happy we can finally say I actually have a functioning station.
Hopefully we'll get these flying milkweed in the air.
It's turned out to be a great year, 14 Black Swallowtails have been released this year in good health so far . It's looks to be up to 20 or more by sept.  We have enough Anise now to support 30 I'm estimating.

Lots of flies this year , no more than a 10 min wait. Only a few Monarchs though and the same female we saw for weeks found the milkweed and left a brood.  They seem to consume more than the BS cats.

CT Yankee is reporting some success this year as well.

So, we're into Pumpkins this year. Facinating. You can make little punks by hand when the the time is right. You'll have to look it up yourselves.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: radiogaga on August 10, 2018, 0409 UTC
The Mexican sunflowers started flowering here recently, the monarchs are more abundant than ever, real nice to see

rgg
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Josh on August 10, 2018, 0536 UTC
This is good. The dragonflies I raise will need lots of monarchs and swallowtails to consume in mid flight as they do. They can consume several times their weight you know.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Davep on September 20, 2018, 2221 UTC
Total released for 2018   

Black Swallowtail  = Healthy  20 + 1 naturally on plant without intervention.
                              Not viable  3

Monarch  = Healthy 5
                  Not viable = 0

Total known garden production = ~71 (3 years)

The Anise plants"leaves" were consumed by Sept 5 , although they will begin to consume the seed heads provided they are not ripe.
The volume was 2 large plants and 3 first and second year plants= 21 butterflies max .  We plan to have  first year seedlings in the future, they do not mature by Sept as a rule and were used for the last batch.
Again this year , we nearly ran out of food. There were many cats we left to natural selection as well.
Mature flies are still active in the yard as of Sept 20. 

We were very pleased with the 5 monarchs finally  , it took three years to attract a laying female. We have learned to pinch off growth tips of the Milkweed to encourage new growth over the season and delay seed production , that may be the revelation that we needed for success over the previous fails.

Thanks also to CT Yankee for his participation over the last two seasons, his efforts and reports much appreciated .

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Nw5yMwogtDc

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=wZSrhfV0sUw


Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Ct Yankee on September 21, 2018, 2353 UTC


The 9th monarch was released here yesterday.  Barely warm enough for it - hung round overnight until the sun warmed things up.  We did have one day that three emerged with 2 hours of each other. Did not bring any swallowtail caterpillars in, dozens seen in the yard up through this week.  Most unique creature in the yard this year: Pileated Woodpecker ( think Woody) on Memorial Day. 
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Davep on May 31, 2019, 1351 UTC
5 Black swallowtails , 3 today were released 5/31/19 on an early batch found on the p!ants Mid May.  This is the earliest cycle we've seen so far before the Anise was ready and found them on Dill.
No others in the que at this time, but we've never seen cats before June 15 in the past.
The milkweed is ready for Monarchs and is healthy , but we've not seen them so far

Edit ,  saw a Monarch in the yard at 1935z  must be karma
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Josh on June 01, 2019, 2015 UTC
No butterflies to mention yet but saw first lightning bugs the other day.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Ct Yankee on August 05, 2019, 1806 UTC
Monarchs flying through yard daily and laying eggs between 1600-2000utc.  Ct Yankee butterfly farm production to moment: All monarchs: 5 released, 3 chrysalises up, and untold number of eggs/caterpillars in plastic boxes with our own organic 😉milkweed.

Bunches of different butterflies on wild thyme that grows, and I let flower, in lawn.  Swallowtail caterpillars wiped out a planterís box of dill, was going to go in the pickles we made last weekend (not the caterpillars, Josh.  This wasnít the Tequila Pickles 😵).  Hummingbird moths (about same size as namesake) are now feeding off flowers in yard.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: ChrisSmolinski on August 05, 2019, 1829 UTC
Random data point: I happened to see a Monarch today while taking a letter down to the mailbox.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Fansome on August 05, 2019, 2115 UTC
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_minor_characters_in_the_Alice_series#/media/File:Bread_and_butterfly.jpg
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Josh on August 05, 2019, 2135 UTC
Organic milkweed?




Fing hippies!
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: ChrisSmolinski on August 05, 2019, 2150 UTC
Organic milkweed?

Dolphin safe?  ;D

I saw several of the usual Swallowtail butterflies (yellow and black) while outside later in the evening, but unfortunately no more Monarchs. Plus some cabbage butterflies.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Pigmeat on August 06, 2019, 0020 UTC
But does it carry chemicals that fend off penguin venom?

I've been seeing more monarchs in higher numbers the past couple of weeks than I have in years. It's a good year for them here.

Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Davep on August 08, 2019, 1940 UTC
I'm seeing some Monarchs this year. No eggs unfortunately although just seeing them is good.
Im up to 12 black swallowtails so far , we had a lull during July but not many cats . They also got our dill this year .
 Davep production farm 4 chrysalises at the moment.  Ive tried some alternative methods this year , because its been a busy summer. Mainly i tried to move the cats to a hidden Anise , away from the popular one we started with and its high number of hungry predators like the innard sucking wasps that just leave the skin like baked chicken. Success was moderate and had them chrysalis on the plant , but some we never saw again.  I have switched back to the indoor production facility to pump up my numbers

We also observed slim Jim ,a Mantis ( Chinese i think -brown) eating a swallowtail like a corncob.  I got a great pic I'll try to post for PM to bring back his memories.

Overall very happy, it doesnt take but a few moments to see something. This year more Monarchs than we've seen in previous years along with Zebra, Tiger and the black varieties, painted ladies, a gulf fritillary and a Red Admiral
No wind born monsanto products and only one mosquito truck .
Word to the CTY production facility and thanks to everyone for your awareness
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Davep on August 08, 2019, 2007 UTC
(https://i.imgur.com/cr9RRB2.jpg)

That looks like one of mine
I accept the food chain even though he's a "come here" Bon appitite , slim 
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Josh on August 08, 2019, 2118 UTC
Haven't seen any monarchs yet, but plenty of the black and yellow guys.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Ct Yankee on August 09, 2019, 2254 UTC


#6 released today, although she would have busted out if not set free - fiesty lady .  4 chrysalises up, many eggs/caterpillars. Oh yes, 38 quarts of blueberries from my 6 bushes, we will hit 50 - new outdoor record  ;)!
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: jFarley on August 14, 2019, 1546 UTC
Random data point: I happened to see a Monarch today while taking a letter down to the mailbox.

Yet another Random Data Point:  In the last week, I have usually noted about a dozen Monarchs at a time in the yard.  They seem very frisky.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: ChrisSmolinski on August 14, 2019, 1610 UTC
I saw another Monarch today while out driving.

"The plural of anecdote is data"  :)
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: fpeconsultant on August 14, 2019, 1625 UTC
I recently read an article in a WI Outdoor News magazine that claimed that so called "home grown" Monarchs don't migrate south with their "naturally propagated" brethren and thus die when cold weather hits.  I don't know if this is true but the claim was made to explain why all of the "home grow" methods made by people trying to "save the monarch" really aren't working.
The article also claimed that the reason they (and many pollinators) are in decline is because the are developing a form of Alzheimer's disease: they know they shouldn't stay where they are but they can't remember where to go.......like bees that leave a hive never to be seen again.  The article blamed pesticides.
All I know is on my 3 acres near Chicago I have seen more Monarchs this year than in the past 10.  I have at least 2-300 wild milkweed plants that sprout up each year but I have never interfered in the monarchs natural cycle - even last week when I stumbled upon a walking stick devouring a monarch caterpillar.  Darwinism.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Davep on August 14, 2019, 2106 UTC
Glad to hear of your milkweed plantations, FP !  Plant and leave be ,no one will argue with.
I'm a firm believer in the environment taking care of itself too, thats best but only works in a balance
Like a car, you jack with one system it effects another.  Theres no doubt the use of current pesticides/ gmo is going down a short term profit / long term costs road.
As for bringing them into a managed environment , i admit i have no idea how this effects any outcome.
 Ive tried to contemplate that and the only thing i think that makes a difference is how many in the last gen before winter no matter how many in prior generations.
Several monarch chrysalis have been found wintering 10 miles south of here (zone 8a)near Sandbridge by butterfly extremist that were surprised , so all is not known.
Theres really very little data and a lot of theory.
I found by bringing them in, you learn a great deal of minutia that may not be of actual worth just facinating. You get a good feeling when they fly away . The grandchildren demanded it this year , they delight in it and the transformations in this day of electronic entertainment, they still love a bug in a jar. I feel good about that and hope it might spark a life interest in nature .  The neighbors have all dropped by and asked what we were doing and so they got a big education. If nothing else a few more people were made aware .

I guess.  8)


Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Ct Yankee on August 15, 2019, 1332 UTC
There is a company called Nature Works in Northford, Ct about a half dozen miles south of me.  They just sold plants outdoors until monarchs naturally came.  Now, they are also raising and educating on monarchs - they release several hundred a year (I have wondered if several of my visitors flew from there).  Nature Works tags all their butterflies, at least two of their raised butterflies were recovered in Mexico.

I will give some merit to the notion that domestically raised butterflies may lose some innate navigation skills.  I will add from the experience of releasing 3 dozen butterflies that ones I release earlier in the summer head north, later in the summer they fly south.  I have a good expanse to monitor them once they leave my yard.

I am also seeing more monarchs then ever before, they are coming through daily. 
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: fpeconsultant on August 15, 2019, 1609 UTC
Yes CT Yankee & Dave I agree with your posts.  We will probably never know if humans are helping by home growing monarchs but I'd be willing to bet we aren't hurting the situation.
Maybe someday we will know all of these answers.  Or not....
FPE
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: Josh on August 15, 2019, 2008 UTC
Still haven't seen many monarchs but their predators, the dragonflies, are fairly common. Plenty of the black and yellows around still.
Title: Re: Papilio Polyxenes
Post by: ChrisSmolinski on August 15, 2019, 2011 UTC
No Monarchs seen today while doing about 5 hours of yard work, but I did see the usual Swallowtails and other assorted butterflies.