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Author Topic: How "free" is the 6.483 MHz.?  (Read 4366 times)

Offline Intersoundradio

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How "free" is the 6.483 MHz.?
« on: March 10, 2014, 1719 UTC »
I was looking for a "clean" short wave frequency to broadcast (wihout jammers, utility, maritime, etc.). One of the best I found is the 6.483 MHz., but how clean is this frequency in other parts of the world? ??

So please dear listener, can you tell me the situation about this frequency in your hometown/country?

« Last Edit: March 10, 2014, 1913 UTC by Intersoundradio »
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rdla4

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Re: How "free" is the 6.483 MHz.?
« Reply #1 on: March 10, 2014, 2217 UTC »
This will most likely vary quite a bit depending on time of day---among other things.

Right now, 6483 is clear here, but does have some QRM from a utility station 0n 6487khz.

2217UTC in Georgia, USA

Offline ChrisSmolinski

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Re: How "free" is the 6.483 MHz.?
« Reply #2 on: March 10, 2014, 2252 UTC »
The problem, as always, with operating on a non-standard pirate frequency/band is that if no one knows you're there, they won't know to listen for you. And other than someone stumbling on your transmission, no one will likely hear it.
Chris Smolinski
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Offline ff

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Re: How "free" is the 6.483 MHz.?
« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2014, 0103 UTC »
The problem, as always, with operating on a non-standard pirate frequency/band is that if no one knows you're there, they won't know to listen for you. And other than someone stumbling on your transmission, no one will likely hear it.

Absolutely correct!  Take it from me Intersound, one who has operated mainly as a "backwaters pirate" for the last 20+ years, Chris speaks the truth.  Unless you pre-announce, your audience will be VERY sparse and often will not be there at all.  If you crave "riches and fame", then stay within the established pirate zone(s) and brave the QRM/QRN like everybody else does.  But if that's NOT what drives you then... welcome to the dark corners.  There's plenty of free space and - you'll save on QSLs!
Hailing from the upstate boondocks region of the progressive paradise which once was New York State

Offline glimmer twin

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Re: How "free" is the 6.483 MHz.?
« Reply #4 on: March 11, 2014, 1442 UTC »
Malaysian Navy station 9MR uses 6483. Not sure if that is an issue for you (power/location ??). Also there was a Globe station on 6484.5  Tianjin Radio (China) but I don't know what their status is.
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Offline Intersoundradio

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Re: How "free" is the 6.483 MHz.?
« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2014, 1612 UTC »
Thank you all for the reactions! :)
But this frequency is not so strange as it looks. In the past, the SW-pirates in Europe were only broadcasting in the 76-, 48- and 41-meterbands, but in the last years you see more and more stations looking for another frequency. For example, Pinkpanther radio is on the 6.803 MHz., Cool-AM is mostly to find on the 6.735, Laser Hot Hits on the 4.026, and there are other stations, who prefere frequencies like the 6.550 (like Radio Ramona did a few years ago), etc.
Also the 5.800 MHz. or higher is quite popular in the last years. The same with frequencies above the 6.900 MHz.
Dangerous SW-frequencies in the 48-meterband are 6.215, 6.268, 6.312, 6.313, 6.331 (emergency frequencies).
Almost every European pirate are transmitting in the "normal" AM-mode.
But I get the answers where I'm looking for. Thanks! The frequency here shall be now 6.480 MHz. 8)
« Last Edit: March 13, 2014, 1500 UTC by Intersoundradio »
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Offline Intersoundradio

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Re: How "free" is the 6.483 MHz.?
« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2014, 0556 UTC »
Malaysian Navy station 9MR uses 6483. Not sure if that is an issue for you (power/location ??). Also there was a Globe station on 6484.5  Tianjin Radio (China) but I don't know what their status is.
I almost forgot to tell you my country... I'm living in the Netherlands and the power here is 30 Watts AM. I'm working with a transmitter, which can make a signal on the 48-, 76- and MW-frequencies. The antenna is a "litze" longwire about 24 meters and 9 meters high. The earth is 70 meters copperwire in the ground. The antenna is tuned with a selfmade LC-antenna tuner. ;)
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Offline ka1iic

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Re: How "free" is the 6.483 MHz.?
« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2014, 1938 UTC »
As Chris said being on an 'out of band' frequency is a serious set back unless you advertise <sigh>

Just how many on here can claim to have heard any of the 'Radio Clandestine' broadcasts up in the 21 meter shortwave broadcast band back in the 70's -80's etc etc ???  they were using a kw+ station... I heard them once but only because I was visiting the station (Unknowingly) once upon a time... I was looking at the transmitter at the time of the broadcast too...  believe it or not...

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Offline ff

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Re: How "free" is the 6.483 MHz.?
« Reply #8 on: March 13, 2014, 1900 UTC »
Just how many on here can claim to have heard any of the 'Radio Clandestine' broadcasts up in the 21 meter shortwave broadcast band back in the 70's -80's etc etc ???  they were using a kw+ station...

I never did Vince, and back in those days I did half-hourly sweeps of 4 or 5 different bands.  I caught RC several times in the 3450 area and I know from talks with the op that they used 32M (9-9.5) and 19M (15-15.1) occasionally.  Nowadays most folks just don't do much searching.  Its a shame - there's so much unused "real estate" out there.
Hailing from the upstate boondocks region of the progressive paradise which once was New York State

Offline ChrisSmolinski

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Re: How "free" is the 6.483 MHz.?
« Reply #9 on: March 13, 2014, 1932 UTC »
I think that SDRs are making it easier for listeners to check some of the less traveled parts of HF. I run (and record) my SDR from 6800-7000 each night, so I will pick up pirates that are not on 6925 but are still somewhere in the 43 meter band. 6880, for example, has been active lately. In theory you can record even larger portions of HF, but the disk storage requirements go up proportionally. Plus the time to go through the recordings.

My memory is that back in the day (yes, I have a Radio Clandestine QSL, I think from the 41 meter band) pirates were more concerned about the FCC, and tended to be more random with their frequency selection. Always using the same frequency as everyone else was not a good idea. The upside to this (even today) is that you get some people tuning in who otherwise would not hear your transmission.

Back in the 80s and 90s I recall the lower part of 3 MHz band being used on a regular basis, and of course both above and below the 40 meter ham band, plus just above 15 MHz. And MW was a lot busier back then as well.

For whatever reason, that isn't the case today, and most activity is confined to the 43 meter band. And just a few frequencies, really. My guesses would be:
1. It maximizes the number of listeners. Just use 6925, and you're almost certain to be heard by someone.
2. The reduced fear of FCC action. 
3. Propagation wise, it's a pretty good choice. You get out a few hundred miles in the daytime, and at night a few thousand miles (although like a donut with a skip zone around the transmitter location). Noise levels are not too bad, except perhaps in the summer if there's storms around. 

If you want to compromise on one band, it's really the best  way to go.
Chris Smolinski
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Offline ff

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Re: How "free" is the 6.483 MHz.?
« Reply #10 on: March 13, 2014, 2144 UTC »
If you want to compromise on one band, it's really the best  way to go.

Absolutely!  I would love to see more activity in the 7450-7600 area though.  Its easy for the old ham tubers to hit on their 40M setting, we IRFheads can still develop usable power there, the Class D people can still build a workable driver for there, and unlike the lower bands it is similar in propagation and noise levels to our beloved 43M band.  With the peskies and various other QRMlings it would be nice to have another option available...
Hailing from the upstate boondocks region of the progressive paradise which once was New York State