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Author Topic: After the transmitter what's next?  (Read 3824 times)

Offline Longwire_radio

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After the transmitter what's next?
« on: May 24, 2014, 0827 UTC »
I need a basic list of audio gear, mixer I know is one don't know if I'll need anything else beside a mic. The transmitter I'm going to use is my mint 1956 efj valiant.
1956 EF Johnson valiant
"80lbs of dodo brown with the heavy plate modulated sound"
Long wire radio -= coming soon =-
QSL: longwireradio@gmail.com

Offline BoomboxDX

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Re: After the transmitter what's next?
« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2014, 1223 UTC »
You'll want some sort of processing / compression - limiting. Otherwise, your station (if that's what you're building?) will sound very dry.  Even a guitar effects box compressor limiter between mike and transmitter will give it some improvement.

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+ GE SRIII, PR-D5 & TRF on MW.
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Offline redhat

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Re: After the transmitter what's next?
« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2014, 1636 UTC »
Keep your eyes on ebay for some sort of an am compliance processor.  Inovonics made all kinds on them, the 222 which is basically just a limiter and NRSC filter.  Their 230 I think was a 8 band mono compressor/limiter with AGC and filtering, can be made to sound very dense and loud.  I know a lot of the euro's use Behringer multidynes and ultramizers, but I've never played with one that I could get to sounding good.

If your state-side, look at rat-shack for a 4 channel mixer.  You can also pick these up from amazon from people like pyle pro (I know, I can't take the name seriously either).  For mics, Shure SM-58's will do, but need some EQ to sound right.  I've been running SM-7's for years and like them alot, but you can find a suitable dynamic mic from amazon or someplace for around $150, less if you watch sales through places like musicians friend or guitar center.

You'll also need either cd players, a computer, or both for song and music bed playback.  Everything now is on the computer, I use ZaraRadio for on air assist, but it won't run on Windows 7 or 8, XP is the only stable platform for it.  Some nostalgic pirates still use cart machines and turntables, and someday my fixed studio will have both.

If you plan on taking phone calls, you'll need a hybrid to get the audio into and out of the phone line.
There are bluetooth ones now that allow you to use a free redirect number to a prepaid cell, and thus get around the liability of having a land line.

A decent pair of speakers and an amp for studio monitors.

Lots more, I sure, but that's the basics.

Hope that helps!

+-RH
« Last Edit: May 24, 2014, 1644 UTC by redhat »
Somewhere under the stars...
WinRadio Excalibur/305 w/ a chi-town resonant loop, Kenwood KDC-U356 for mobile listening.
Please send QSL's and reception reports to xfmshortwave [at] gmail [d0t] com

Offline Longwire_radio

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Re: After the transmitter what's next?
« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2014, 1901 UTC »
Keep your eyes on ebay for some sort of an am compliance processor.  Inovonics made all kinds on them, the 222 which is basically just a limiter and NRSC filter.  Their 230 I think was a 8 band mono compressor/limiter with AGC and filtering, can be made to sound very dense and loud.  I know a lot of the euro's use Behringer multidynes and ultramizers, but I've never played with one that I could get to sounding good.

If your state-side, look at rat-shack for a 4 channel mixer.  You can also pick these up from amazon from people like pyle pro (I know, I can't take the name seriously either).  For mics, Shure SM-58's will do, but need some EQ to sound right.  I've been running SM-7's for years and like them alot, but you can find a suitable dynamic mic from amazon or someplace for around $150, less if you watch sales through places like musicians friend or guitar center.

You'll also need either cd players, a computer, or both for song and music bed playback.  Everything now is on the computer, I use ZaraRadio for on air assist, but it won't run on Windows 7 or 8, XP is the only stable platform for it.  Some nostalgic pirates still use cart machines and turntables, and someday my fixed studio will have both.

If you plan on taking phone calls, you'll need a hybrid to get the audio into and out of the phone line.
There are bluetooth ones now that allow you to use a free redirect number to a prepaid cell, and thus get around the liability of having a land line.

A decent pair of speakers and an amp for studio monitors.

Lots more, I sure, but that's the basics.

Hope that helps!

+-RH


Very good I'm just trying to get the basic's right now..the audio chain is stock in the valiant so I don't plan on messing around d with that to much..so a compressor mixer and a basic mic. I'm going to hunt around now. Going to be using a inverted v ocf dipole with the ends being 50 or so feet off the ground. I'm in the hunt for a freq counter also. All trial and error I guess, I would like to take calls at some point but just want to run a basic  30min show once a week and go from there. I have massive amounts of music on my nas so I'm going to build a basic machine for the station. Going to check rat shack out asap on those mixers.
« Last Edit: May 24, 2014, 1906 UTC by Longwire_radio »
1956 EF Johnson valiant
"80lbs of dodo brown with the heavy plate modulated sound"
Long wire radio -= coming soon =-
QSL: longwireradio@gmail.com

Offline Longwire_radio

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Re: After the transmitter what's next?
« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2014, 2139 UTC »
You'll want some sort of processing / compression - limiting. Otherwise, your station (if that's what you're building?) will sound very dry.  Even a guitar effects box compressor limiter between mike and transmitter will give it some improvement.



I've been on the hunt for the last 2 hours..this compressor is going to be a pain to get / find a decent one at a decent price..so I could try out a guitar compressor pedal and run it inline?...mixer,antenna,xmiter, thats the easy part haha..I'm going to do some more digging around..
1956 EF Johnson valiant
"80lbs of dodo brown with the heavy plate modulated sound"
Long wire radio -= coming soon =-
QSL: longwireradio@gmail.com

Offline Chris Lobdell

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Re: After the transmitter what's next?
« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2014, 2145 UTC »
Of course if you pre-record your shows, you can use software for compression and other effects. Sound studio on the MAC OS X works well in that regard.
Receiver: Eton E1, JRC NRD-525 and 545
Aerial: MFJ G5RV dipole
near Lowell Massachusetts - Gateway To The Merrimack Valley.
QSL to: crlobdell1@gmail.com
Amateur Radio Station: KC1IUK

Offline redhat

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Re: After the transmitter what's next?
« Reply #6 on: May 24, 2014, 2250 UTC »
For basic transmitter protection, a behringer or equivalent compressor/limiter is required.  Hunt around pawn shops and online sites.  You should be able to find one for $100 or so.  If your really on a budget and are electronically inclined, build a simple limiter from a schematic on the web.  Parts should only run you a few dollars.  Making it RFI hardened will be the hardest part.

+-RH
Somewhere under the stars...
WinRadio Excalibur/305 w/ a chi-town resonant loop, Kenwood KDC-U356 for mobile listening.
Please send QSL's and reception reports to xfmshortwave [at] gmail [d0t] com

Offline Longwire_radio

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Re: After the transmitter what's next?
« Reply #7 on: May 27, 2014, 1241 UTC »
For basic transmitter protection, a behringer or equivalent compressor/limiter is required.  Hunt around pawn shops and online sites.  You should be able to find one for $100 or so.  If your really on a budget and are electronically inclined, build a simple limiter from a schematic on the web.  Parts should only run you a few dollars.  Making it RFI hardened will be the hardest part.

+-RH

I'm more on a budget as I've been known to 'ham' it up from time to time. I just bought a behringer 802 mixer. Im going to keep searching around for the compressor..just got a big spool of copper wire..going to build my dipole today..hope to get on the air soon!
1956 EF Johnson valiant
"80lbs of dodo brown with the heavy plate modulated sound"
Long wire radio -= coming soon =-
QSL: longwireradio@gmail.com

Offline crab

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Re: After the transmitter what's next?
« Reply #8 on: May 27, 2014, 1940 UTC »
Before you spend more money on hardawre, consider software.   I use Reaper. 


REAPER is digital audio workstation software: a complete multitrack audio and MIDI recording, editing, processing, mixing, and mastering environment.

Record audio and MIDI from multiple inputs simultaneously
Layer recorded tracks and takes over previous recordings
Edit recordings in almost any imaginable way
Hundreds of audio and MIDI processing effects included, or choose from thousands of third-party effects
All editing and effects are completely non-destructive

http://www.reaper.fm/index.php

free to try; $60 non commercial license.

You'll get several different compressors and limiters included, and thousands more effects are available free.

Offline Pigmeat

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Re: After the transmitter what's next?
« Reply #9 on: May 27, 2014, 2113 UTC »
Most mic inputs on PC's feed into a built in compressor/limiter circuit on the soundcard. As AM is mono format, you can run your audio in through the mic input and out via the regular audio ouputs.

You'll need a snap on ferrite or two for the audio to transmitter feedline, a stereo to mono adapter at the PC's line out, so it sees a balanced load, and you're set. All you have to do is adjust the volume for best sound.

What Redhat said about pawn shops is solid advice. I saw a nice seven channel Alexysis(?) compressor/limiter a few weeks back for just over 100 bucks. Analog EQ's are practically free, 10-15 bucks and up, but you'll want to work out a return deal with the shop in case you get it home and the pots are shot.

Remember, tweakers and junkies have the right of way in all pawn shops.


Offline ff

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Re: After the transmitter what's next?
« Reply #10 on: May 27, 2014, 2152 UTC »
From my perspective what crab said about hardware/software is essentially true.  I have spent big $$$ over the years buying a lot of application-dedicated hardware only to see most of it rendered valueless by a bit of cheap (or free) software.  I would however agree with Redhat - invest in a hardwired compressor/limiter and read the instruction manual a couple of times.  Eradicating RFI from your chain will be your biggest headache.  Stock up on clamshell ferrites and bypass caps.  All Electronics has them reasonably-priced with a flat $7 shipping fee and no minimum.  As to software, there's plenty of it out there.  I wouldn't pay money for a bunch of functionality though.  I doubt you'll ever use it.  I pound out all my stuff with Audacity.  It works well, is open-sourced so improvements are available often, and has a very short learning curve.  And its free!

http://www.sonicdownloads.net/download/Audio/Audacity/

Years ago I pirated with a Valiant.  I recall originally bypassing the 2nd audio preamp completely because most of the bandwidth filtering was there.  Later on I had a more knowledgeable friend do the conversion work properly, but there was really very little difference in doing it the right way.  It was a great rig, built like a tank, and blew out a very potent signal.  I never needed a monitor to know where in the program I was at - you could easily hear the audio vibrating those 6146Ws.  I also miss the WHOOOOMPH! it made when the carrier was switched on.  These silly little MOSFETs I now use lack the romance, and the hardiness of that old tuber - have fun with it Longwire!
Hailing from the upstate boondocks region of the progressive paradise which once was New York State

Offline redhat

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Re: After the transmitter what's next?
« Reply #11 on: May 29, 2014, 1849 UTC »
All valid points.  If you plan on doing canned shows, the software processing route is probably best.  For those like myself that operate live, hardware processing is the only way to go.

Pigmeat, not all AM is Mono ;)

+-RH
Somewhere under the stars...
WinRadio Excalibur/305 w/ a chi-town resonant loop, Kenwood KDC-U356 for mobile listening.
Please send QSL's and reception reports to xfmshortwave [at] gmail [d0t] com

Offline crab

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Re: After the transmitter what's next?
« Reply #12 on: May 29, 2014, 2133 UTC »
If all you need to do is jam a mic into a transmitter, than buy a Shure SM58 and go. You can sell it for the entire $98 you paid for it if you get bored of what you're doing. If I was starting out now in audio processing, and I'm not, I'd go with software first. The mixer, track counts limited only by the D/A interface you buy, instant recording of your shows, and limitless different processors, reverbs, effects, etc. are all FREE. I suppose if you are doing basically live sound and want to mix in some music or other feeds while you yap, Audacity would be great.  Hardware is fun, believe me I have piles of it,  but software is very nice.   And you can change effects without spending a nickel.

Offline BoomboxDX

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Re: After the transmitter what's next?
« Reply #13 on: June 05, 2014, 1424 UTC »
RE: compressors:

You can get a Boss compressor / limiter stompbox for probably $100 or less (probably much less, used) (I just typed in "Boss Compressor Sustainer" on Google and several ads show them for $99 -- It's possible you may be able to get one cheaper at a guitar store).

I've used a Boss Compressor Sustainer for home recording and it works well for hi-fi, mono -- plugged between the mic and the recorder, or between the mic, the 4 channel mixer, and the recorder. Should work for radio also.
An AM radio Boombox DXer.
+ GE SRIII, PR-D5 & TRF on MW.
The usual Realistic culprits on SW (and a Panasonic).