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Author Topic: UNID 8000 LSB 2229 UTC 2017-03-18  (Read 1364 times)

Offline Static_Mantra

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UNID 8000 LSB 2229 UTC 2017-03-18
« on: March 18, 2017, 2229 UTC »
at the moment hearing music very weakly, pirate or ??
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Location: London, Ontario
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Offline ChrisSmolinski

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Re: UNID 8000 LSB 2229 UTC 2017-03-18
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2017, 2236 UTC »
Weak here, pescadores?
Chris Smolinski
Westminster, MD
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Offline R4002

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Re: UNID 8000 LSB 2229 UTC 2017-03-18
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2017, 1821 UTC »
8000 kHz lies in the same "allocation type" as 6765-7000 kHz ("fixed/mobile") which means a grab bag of all sorts of stuff.  The pescadores seem to like these allocations (or bands, I should say) so that would support Chris' theory.  The use LSB mode sort of does as well.

Also, 8000 is an easy-to-remember frequency.  It seems like the pescadores/freebanders like to do this.  6919 kHz, 6900 kHz, 6888 kHz, 8000 kHz, etc.

Wouldn't surprise me if there's fishermen using 7777 kHz and 8888 kHz somewhere :D
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Offline Token

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Re: UNID 8000 LSB 2229 UTC 2017-03-18
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2017, 1916 UTC »
Wouldn't surprise me if there's fishermen using 7777 kHz and 8888 kHz somewhere :D

I have heard Peskies, probably fishermen from the sounds of things in the background, on 8888 kHz before, however on 7777 kHz all that shows up in my logs is a couple of different digital type signals.

T!
T!
Mojave Desert, California USA

Offline R4002

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Re: UNID 8000 LSB 2229 UTC 2017-03-18
« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2017, 1455 UTC »
8888 kHz is in an aircraft band/aeronautical allocation - as is 6666 kHz. 

I'd like to see your logs for other fishermen/peskies frequencies, Token
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Offline ZS6AF

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Re: UNID 8000 LSB 2229 UTC 2017-03-18
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2020, 1842 UTC »
South African Fisherman on east coast of South africa is using 8888.88 khz and 12352 khz

Offline R4002

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Re: UNID 8000 LSB 2229 UTC 2017-03-18
« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2020, 1323 UTC »
8888.8 kHz and 8888.88 kHz are both super easy to remember frequencies.   Same with 6666.6 kHz (which is heavily used by peskies and freebanders in the Americas). 

Interesting to know that the South Africans are using 8888.88 kHz and 12352 kHz.  It wouldn't surprise me if they used 12345.6 kHz or 5678.9 kHz, etc. 
U.S. East Coast, various HF/VHF/UHF radios/scanners/receivers