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Author Topic: Does your area still have CB "home channels" or "town channels"?  (Read 1747 times)
R4002
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« Reply #15 on: August 07, 2017, 1547 UTC »

Channel 44 as in 27.445 MHz?  Some of the locals around here call refer to one of their out of band / freeband CB channels as Channel 50 - 27.505 MHz (usually followed by "yeah, go to channel 8 and then go up one band" since most people are using export gear with a channel display and a band switch, but no frequency display or frequency counter). 
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« Reply #16 on: August 07, 2017, 1602 UTC »

When I was active it was hard to get an export radio. Most everyone had switches to pull up or ground PLL pins. You needed a chart to know what channel you were on. The President Madison I used at home had a purple wire that you could cut on the Ch 9 quick button and that went automatically to 27.445 MHz. That was the reason it became the home channel. All the mobiles in our group were Uniden Grants and had the same feature.

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Josh
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« Reply #17 on: August 07, 2017, 1818 UTC »

Most of us in my gang in Omaha around 89 or so ran 148s, modded by a great guy named Lady Chaser. This is steeped in cb kulture lol. Of course, a modulation hack was employed as well, making it grossly distorted but several times more power output. Basically the amc was removed from the circuit. The 148 was/is a cult classic but the 2510 shamed it save for in ssb selectivity. The 2510 is a proper radio, the 148s should be left stock. Nowadays I run a stock radio shack copy of the pc122, with the amc adjusted to just fold back on peak ssb power it does 18w and I'm satisfied with that.
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« Reply #18 on: August 08, 2017, 1616 UTC »

I also had several Motorola Mocat CBs that were nice. They weren't strong on modulation but had terrific receivers. No one would believe you when you said you had a Motorola CB.  Smiley

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X3yYeUZNfM0
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Josh
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« Reply #19 on: August 08, 2017, 1741 UTC »

I also had several Motorola Mocat CBs that were nice. They weren't strong on modulation but had terrific receivers. No one would believe you when you said you had a Motorola CB.  Smiley

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X3yYeUZNfM0

A frond gave me a borked one that had ssb, it was neat looking but I never got it working.
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« Reply #20 on: August 08, 2017, 2344 UTC »

I might have one of those in storage... need to go look for it sometime.
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« Reply #21 on: August 10, 2017, 1118 UTC »

Deep within the bowels of West Virginia, CB CH 12 is very much a staple where I am locally, (Which is surprising when any skip rolls in, CH 11 has terrible bleed over from those over MOD mud ducks.). Just the next county south of me, CH 35 is active nightly. Some of the coal trucks in the daytime, I hear them on CH 8. And, when the weather gets cooler, there's an on / off group that likes to meet on LSB CH 39 on various evenings regionally around the WV, KY, and OH, tri-state. There seems to be a small group in the Capital area on CH 26. And, with Routes 64, 77, and 79, here with their multitude of wrecks, CB CH 19 is a necessity for sure, with truckers being boots on the ground to 1st bitch about any mess-ups. Certainly a reason for me to keep a CB in my truck, fo' sure. Oh... And I've heard various, weak, traffic on CH 2. albeit, I don't know where they're coming from. So, very busy CB-wise in WV.
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« Reply #22 on: August 11, 2017, 0416 UTC »

Back in the 70's and 80's when weed growing here was on a huge scale, the growers would head out to set on their patches around this time of year until harvest in late Sept./early Oct. They all communicated via CB. There weren't that many people living out that way then, and nearly all the growers were locals. You might not know where they were, but everyone knew who they were by their voices, it was comical to listen to.

Local sheriffs and judges are elected, and the economy had turned to crap in the late 70's. The law wasn't about to go out and track ol' Bub down, who was simply trying to provide for his family, and risk pissing off the couple of hundred people he was related to or friends with. Those votes could swing a tight election in a lightly populated county where those growers were one of the main yearly infusions of hard cash. The only growers that got nabbed regularly were what was left of the commune types who'd arrived from out of state in the late 60's and 70's.
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« Reply #23 on: August 11, 2017, 1414 UTC »

Back in the 70's and 80's when weed growing here was on a huge scale, the growers would head out to set on their patches around this time of year until harvest in late Sept./early Oct. They all communicated via CB. There weren't that many people living out that way then, and nearly all the growers were locals. You might not know where they were, but everyone knew who they were by their voices, it was comical to listen to.

Local sheriffs and judges are elected, and the economy had turned to crap in the late 70's. The law wasn't about to go out and track ol' Bub down, who was simply trying to provide for his family, and risk pissing off the couple of hundred people he was related to or friends with. Those votes could swing a tight election in a lightly populated county where those growers were one of the main yearly infusions of hard cash. The only growers that got nabbed regularly were what was left of the commune types who'd arrived from out of state in the late 60's and 70's.

Minus the radio communication portion, this story reminds me of what Larry Livermore, the founder of Lookout! Records (the East Bay punk label that issued the first releases from Operation Ivy, Green Day, and The Donnas, among others) said about his time in some forested part of northern California in the late 70s/early 80s. The Lookout! name was first used for a zine he self-published while living there, named after a fire lookout tower. Among other topics, he wrote about the rather open secret of MJ growing in the area, which apparently formed a significant part of the local economy. Apparently a bunch of the growers showed up on his door and "suggested" that he not write about that anymore. He would soon relocate to Berkeley, get involved with the then-brand-new Gilman Street Project (an all ages punk club where the aforementioned bands, among others, would first make their mark), start his label, and eventually make rock history.

Anyway, the point is that it's funny how open some of this stuff was. When I was in Seattle in the late 90s, a very large grow operation was discovered on the grounds of Lake Sammamish State Park, just east of town. It had obviously been there for years, and had covered escape routes that may well have been utilized when the cops stumbled upon it - nobody was ever arrested. But it covered a few acres and was apparently just right there for anyone to see if they went just a bit off trail.
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Denver, CO.
Grundig Satellit 750, Tecsun PL-600, SDRPlay RSP2 Pro.
two homebrewed mag loops (10' and 15' circumference).
Soon to include RA0SMS mini-whip, but need mounting before that goes online.
eQSL's appreciated, wickerjennie (at) gmail
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