Author Topic: Legality of broadcating on 87.9 MHz  (Read 1077 times)

Offline jordan

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Legality of broadcating on 87.9 MHz
« on: October 18, 2017, 2248 UTC »
I've been reading some FCC notices of violations, fines, etc. that they've issued to people. I noticed that some had been busted for using 87.9 MHz, and that they exceeded the limit of 100mV/meter as measured 3 meters from the antenna.  On the standard FM band (88-108 MHz), they have a limit of 250 microvolts per meter measured 3m from antenna.  For comparision, 100mV per meter is a lot more than 250 microvolts, which equates to 100,000 microvolts.  Does anyone know what power wattage this would equate to?

In laymen's terms, it sounds like we're allowed to use a lot more power on 87.9 than we are the rest of the FM band.  Could someone elaborate on this?

Offline redhat

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Re: Legality of broadcating on 87.9 MHz
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2017, 0113 UTC »
The letter of the law is left open to interpretation and as usual quite vague.  This is usually done to allow inspectors greater lattitude in the field. Under the intentional radiator category, the law states 100uV/M below 88 MHz, but 150uV/M above. 

https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/47/15.209

Yet in this part, its states 250uV/M

https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/47/15.239

Who knows....

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Offline digitalmod

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Re: Legality of broadcating on 87.9 MHz
« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2017, 0012 UTC »
 Yes, with the FCC they get paid for accomplishing nothing and taking down perfectly harmless stations. Your government at play.
Radio is dying. We need to give it shelter

Offline Finman

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Re: Legality of broadcating on 87.9 MHz
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2017, 1523 UTC »
Stations that produce harmonics/spurs/intermod that could affect air traffic communications and navigation, life safety issues, are not "harmless".
Just to clarify, I have nothing against pirate radio but pirates need to be aware of where they operate in addition to spectral purity.
Without FCC rules/regs/enforcement in place, I'm not sure I'd feel safe flying.



Yes, with the FCC they get paid for accomplishing nothing and taking down perfectly harmless stations. Your government at play.
« Last Edit: December 20, 2017, 1913 UTC by Finman »

Offline digitalmod

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Re: Legality of broadcating on 87.9 MHz
« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2017, 1510 UTC »
 To Finman,
I have never done a survey, but most PIRATS use ham rigs and FM use equipment comparable with commercial grade.
So, it comes down really to frequencies selected 99 percent of time.
FCC has as it has shown a desire to stop any competition to high power commercial broadcasters.
They have (albeit I guess rarely) taken 1 watt kiddy bedroom stations off the air which is such a waste in IMHO
Technically speaking FCC has lied so often about potentials for interference. This I suppose to keep the rotten tomato lines short in the media.
Often they over kill a situation for drama such as armed federal marshals etc. Ad Nausea ..
Hardly being truthful and always protecting their image as the " good guys".
A station to be harmfully dirty would need in general lots of power, probably well beyond 100 watts. Seriously and PIRAT who could produce such a big rig, I think would use commercial equipment or be electronic engineers themselves and keep spurs in line. Do not believe the PR of the FCC, please, as it is self serving. :-[
« Last Edit: December 30, 2017, 1517 UTC by digitalmod »
Radio is dying. We need to give it shelter

Offline Finman

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Re: Legality of broadcating on 87.9 MHz
« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2018, 1801 UTC »
Jordan;

With all due respect, you have made some serious claims but without evidence to back them up, it's pure conjecture.
I don't subscribe to your conspiracy theory regarding the FCC. Communications laws are in place for very good reasons, and it's the FCC's job to enforce these laws.
If you knowingly break the law by operating a pirate radio transmitter, then you have no right to complain if you get caught.
If you're operating a station, illegal or legal, if there's a complaint filed, the FCC will investigate. Simple as that.

If you get caught speeding and receive a ticket, do you complain that the police dept is self serving?, again, as in comm's law, there are very valid reasons for traffic laws.

The use of "ham rigs" by pirates has little to do with them being operated correctly. Most CB'ers (at least in this area) are using ham rigs, driving ham amplifiers... they are illegal and VERY far from being operated correctly in fact, their operation locally makes the adjacent 10 meter band almost useless ay my QTH.









To Finman,
I have never done a survey, but most PIRATS use ham rigs and FM use equipment comparable with commercial grade.
So, it comes down really to frequencies selected 99 percent of time.
FCC has as it has shown a desire to stop any competition to high power commercial broadcasters.
They have (albeit I guess rarely) taken 1 watt kiddy bedroom stations off the air which is such a waste in IMHO
Technically speaking FCC has lied so often about potentials for interference. This I suppose to keep the rotten tomato lines short in the media.
Often they over kill a situation for drama such as armed federal marshals etc. Ad Nausea ..
Hardly being truthful and always protecting their image as the " good guys".
A station to be harmfully dirty would need in general lots of power, probably well beyond 100 watts. Seriously and PIRAT who could produce such a big rig, I think would use commercial equipment or be electronic engineers themselves and keep spurs in line. Do not believe the PR of the FCC, please, as it is self serving. :-[