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Author Topic: Eggs and dietary risk  (Read 511 times)

Offline Fansome

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Eggs and dietary risk
« on: May 08, 2018, 2348 UTC »
Eggs not linked to cardiovascular risk, despite conflicting advice
7 May 2018
No extra risk for people with pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes

Eating up to 12 eggs a week does not increase cardiovascular risk factors in people with pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes, new research finds – despite conflicting dietary advice continuing around the world.

University of Sydney researchers aim to help clear up conflicting dietary advice around egg consumption, as a new study finds eating up to 12 eggs per week for a year did not increase cardiovascular risk factors in people with pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes.

Published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition today, the research extends on a previous study that found similar results over a period of three months.

Led by Dr Nick Fuller from the University’s Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise and Eating Disorders at the Charles Perkins Centre, the research was conducted with the University of Sydney’s Sydney Medical School and the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital.

In the initial trial, participants aimed to maintain their weight while embarking on a high-egg (12 eggs per week) or low-egg (less than two eggs per week) diet, with no difference in cardiovascular risk markers identified at the end of three months.

The same participants then embarked on a weight loss diet for an additional three months, while continuing their high or low egg consumption. For a further six months – up to 12 months in total – participants were followed up by researchers and continued their high or low egg intake.

At all stages, both groups showed no adverse changes in cardiovascular risk markers and achieved equivalent weight loss – regardless of their level of egg consumption, Dr Fuller explained.

" Despite differing advice around safe levels of egg consumption for people with pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes, our research indicates people do not need to hold back from eating eggs if this is part of a healthy diet. "
Dr Nick Fuller, lead author

A healthy diet as prescribed in this study emphasised replacing saturated fats (such as butter) with monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (such as avocado and olive oil),” he added.

The extended study tracked a broad range of cardiovascular risk factors including cholesterol, blood sugar and blood pressure, with no significant difference in results between the high egg and low egg groups.

“While eggs themselves are high in dietary cholesterol – and people with type 2 diabetes tend to have higher levels of the ‘bad’ low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol – this study supports existing research that shows consumption of eggs has little effect on the levels of cholesterol in the blood of the people eating them,” Dr Fuller explained.

Dr Fuller said the findings of the study were important due to the potential health benefits of eggs for people with pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes, as well as the general population.

" Eggs are a source of protein and micronutrients that could support a range of health and dietary factors including helping to regulate the intake of fat and carbohydrate, eye and heart health, healthy blood vessels and healthy pregnancies.” "
Dr Nick Fuller

The different egg diets also appeared to have no impact on weight, Dr Fuller said.

“Interestingly, people on both the high egg and low egg diets lost an equivalent amount of weight – and continued to lose weight after the three month intended weight loss phase had ended,” he said.

The research was supported with a grant from Australian Eggs; they had no role in the research design, conduct, analyses or writing of the manuscript.

Offline Josh

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Re: Eggs and dietary risk
« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2018, 1649 UTC »
Your brain is mostly cholesterol, you need to eat it to keep them brains happy, or it may just go away.

Offline ChrisSmolinski

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Re: Eggs and dietary risk
« Reply #2 on: May 09, 2018, 1702 UTC »
Eggs are an ideal food for those with T2D, or pre-existing conditions. Well, for anyone, in fact. An excellent fat/protein balance.

Curious some are still going on about dietary cholesterol, that was debunked decades ago.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2018, 1817 UTC by ChrisSmolinski »
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Online Pigmeat

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Re: Eggs and dietary risk
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2018, 1816 UTC »
If more people smoked and drank heavily while driving fast, life expectancies would plummet and they'd quit worrying about this dietary nonsense.

Offline ChrisSmolinski

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Re: Eggs and dietary risk
« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2018, 1817 UTC »
Quote
"Nutritional epidemiology is a scandal," Ioannidis told CBC News. "It should just go to the waste bin."

http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/second-opinion-alcohol180505-1.4648331
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Offline Fansome

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Re: Eggs and dietary risk
« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2018, 1542 UTC »
Reminds me of the old joke about the guy who swore to give up smoking and drinking. The next day he stepped outside and was run over by a burning beer truck.

If more people smoked and drank heavily while driving fast, life expectancies would plummet and they'd quit worrying about this dietary nonsense.

Offline staticlistener

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Re: Eggs and dietary risk
« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2018, 1924 UTC »
I noticed that I was actually able to make it through the morning without getting hungry when I switched my typical daily breakfast from a cup of yogurt and a banana to a single egg and a piece of toast. Didn't have as many issues with mucus either due to cutting back on the yogurt, and seemed to have lost a pound or two. Of course, part of the reason for the switch was my wife decided she wanted chickens but she doesn't eat eggs, so someone had to, but I love them so it doesn't matter.
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Online Pigmeat

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Re: Eggs and dietary risk
« Reply #7 on: May 14, 2018, 2013 UTC »
My cousins raise them, I've always got eggs, although for a long while after the the country folks around here got used to supermarket eggs, keeping chickens fell almost to nil. Home raised chickens produce a better tasting egg and you don't have to sweat the salmonella. Eggs will stay with you unlike most other breakfast food.

Offline staticlistener

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Re: Eggs and dietary risk
« Reply #8 on: May 14, 2018, 2058 UTC »
My cousins raise them, I've always got eggs, although for a long while after the the country folks around here got used to supermarket eggs, keeping chickens fell almost to nil. Home raised chickens produce a better tasting egg and you don't have to sweat the salmonella. Eggs will stay with you unlike most other breakfast food.

And it really doesn't cost much more than buying the same amount of eggs would. A 50 pound bag of feed will last me about 3 weeks feeding 9 chickens, I get about 5 to 6 eggs a day from them, so average I get half a dozen eggs a day for 50 cents, since the feed only costs about $10, and I supplement that with grass and clover that I cut from the yard, which also helps give the yolks that nice deep orange color. My grandfather when I was growing up would feed his chickens rabbit pellets for the same effect. now I just need to get a big glass jar and some red beets so I can make some pickled eggs.
Shelby Brant
Harrisonville, PA
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Offline staticlistener

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Re: Eggs and dietary risk
« Reply #9 on: May 14, 2018, 2059 UTC »
Deviling said red beet eggs is good too, even better than plain deviled eggs in my opinion.
Shelby Brant
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Offline redhat

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Re: Eggs and dietary risk
« Reply #10 on: May 14, 2018, 2239 UTC »
This is one of the reasons I love this board and all the folks on here.  So many interesting things people are into!

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