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Author Topic: NOAA Weather Radio Tropo Logs August September 2018  (Read 718 times)

Offline R4002

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Re: NOAA Weather Radio Tropo Logs August September 2018
« Reply #30 on: September 13, 2018, 1409 UTC »
Did some VHF scanning this morning (0645-0655 local time) and unfortunately the band wasn't as open as it usually is.  I did tune to 162.550 to hear a mixture of several stations (likely the usual suspects of KHB36 and KHB37) - I then crested a hill and KHB37 came in full scale SIO 555 for several seconds, I heard "in the hurricane warning areas" loud and clear, completely blocking out QRM from other stations on frequency...then the signal strength went back down and the frequency became an unintelligible mess again. 

162.450 had the local-ish station (KZZ28) on it with another, UNID station that was clearly underneath.  During pauses I could hear hurricane-related words on 162.450 but was unable to get an ID due to the strength of KZZ28 dominating the frequency. 

Offline R4002

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Re: NOAA Weather Radio Tropo Logs August September 2018
« Reply #31 on: September 20, 2018, 1947 UTC »
WNG586 out of Henderson, NC coming in nearly full scale SIO 444 or so this morning, 0645-0655 local time on 162.500 MHz with positive ID callsign heard.  162.550 MHz was a real mess, as usual during band openings.  Oddly enough, 162.400 and 162.425 were both basically quiet.  Nothing to be made out and those frequencies are usually just as busy.

Also heard KJY86 pop in for a little bit while scanning the band.  Noticed P25 digital traffic on 161.925 MHz, 161.900 MHz and 161.825 MHz as well.  These are marine duplex radiotelephone frequencies that have been re-purposed for land mobile use, in this case as part of the Virginia STARS statewide VHF trunking public safety system.