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Author Topic: 7000 kHz USB freebanders 40 meter intruders vs. hams 2125 UTC 12 Dec 2018  (Read 539 times)

Offline R4002

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Spanish voices on 7000 kHz USB 7.000 MHz 40 meter intruders 7 MHz band

Heard somebody tune up on these guys, then spin his VFO.  Lots of stations working CW on 7002 kHz or 7002.2 kHz.  Hearing Spanish language chatter on 7000 kHz USB making these users officially 40 meter band intruders (gasp!)  - because using frequencies in the aircraft band is any less potentially dangerous.  At 2126 UTC, a very strong CW signal on 7002.2 kHz (S9+20db) and we have a CW QSO now.  Not sure if the 7000 USB users are still there...yes, they are.  Strong CW jamming signals do nothing.

Received via COMMSIGMA SDR KiwiSDR on the CT/MA border.  7000 kHz is a popular spot.
U.S. East Coast, various HF/VHF/UHF radios/scanners/receivers

Offline Exo

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At 2126 UTC, a very strong CW signal on 7002.2 kHz (S9+20db) and we have a CW QSO now.  Not sure if the 7000 USB users are still there...yes, they are.  Strong CW jamming signals do nothing. 

CW is a pitifully ineffective jamming mode. 
Most SSB radios have an auto-notch or else a manual notch filter.

Hams are quite defensive about their bands, perhaps rightly so.
There is probably no way that any lone ham operator could stop 7000 kHz USB and LSB from continuing to be a chaos frequency.
« Last Edit: December 13, 2018, 0115 UTC by Exo »
Exo
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Offline R4002

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7000 kHz seems to be popular all over the place.  When the propagation to South America is strong I often note Spanish and Portuguese voices on 7000 LSB and 7000 USB at the same time, regardless of what CW traffic is on frequency.  Of course, there's also the lets use 6999 kHz USB or 6998 kHz USB crowd that get at least some of their audio over the 7000.0 kHz "border" (if you want to call it that). 

I know the Latin Americans are fond of easy-to-remember frequencies and radios probably default to 7000 kHz, 14000 kHz, 21000 kHz, etc, as you flip through the bands, making it that much more attractive. 
U.S. East Coast, various HF/VHF/UHF radios/scanners/receivers