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Author Topic: Identifying Vintage Radio  (Read 293 times)

Offline Telegrapher

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Identifying Vintage Radio
« on: January 14, 2019, 1852 UTC »
Hello all,

I recently came across an old AM radio on a dumb store for $4. I wonder if it's a rare piece. I can't really find anything about it on the web. And I need a manual for correcting the frequencies as I was testing the PCB and turned some coils to make sure all was still connected.. And it was.

The parts I have questions about are:
Is it a rare piece?
Is there a source where I can find the manual for it?
Misc info regarding everything I need to know about it. How to correct the tuning screws etc..

I hope someone here can help me out.

Just registered as a new member. So I like to say hello to all!

https://imgur.com/a/MIsP5RH


Kind regards,
Telegrapher.

Offline Stretchyman

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Re: Identifying Vintage Radio
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2019, 2104 UTC »
Rare? Looks like a $5 Japanese Superhet. I'd leave the 'Tuning Screws' alone.
« Last Edit: January 14, 2019, 2107 UTC by Stretchyman »
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                            Buy one from me, NOW!

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                                              ;)

Offline Josh

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Re: Identifying Vintage Radio
« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2019, 2135 UTC »
Standard am transistor radio alignment protocol should apply. One of the IF cans will be for the oscillator, the rest will be for the IF strip. A cap will set the high end of the tuning range.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=--cLuftsJR0
https://www.vintage-radio.com/repair-restore-information/transistor_alignment.html
Conveniently located near Vincennes Indiana.

Offline Davep

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Re: Identifying Vintage Radio
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2019, 0233 UTC »
What Josh said., the cans were probably ok ! :-[

Does it have a brand name?
Va Beach Virginia
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Offline Telegrapher

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Re: Identifying Vintage Radio
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2019, 0944 UTC »
On the back I can see a logo with the following details:

(L3) or (B) as the brand logo, U.K. DESING
REGISTRATION NO.1038735

I just discovered the number of the device finally.. It's hard to see when all is printed on a white plastic board as the letters are white also. So I needed to hold in in daylight to clearly see the description on the back :P

And yeah I was already assuming that it wasn't that much of a vintage radio, maybe a replica or something indeed from either Japan or China as they are good at making this kind of stuff (just using a 3D printer for the housing and that's it). I was just curious as the design looks kinda old fashioned so that's why I posted it here in the first place. Anyways, thanks for giving some advice. Time to hunt for the next piece this week :) Maybe this one will be rare.. Flee markets are like a lottery and a surprise box where anything might pop-up :D

Kind regards,
Telegrapher.

Offline Telegrapher

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Re: Identifying Vintage Radio
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2019, 1652 UTC »
Is there a way to turn a Raspberry PI 3 into a signal generator for AM like shown in the video above? I have an oscilloscope handy but fine-tuning is kinda hard when everything has turned off-band. Any tips or suggestions? I would appreciate it very much :)

Kind regards,
Telegrapher.