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Author Topic: On the HAM bands  (Read 454 times)

Offline Josh

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On the HAM bands
« on: March 20, 2020, 2251 UTC »
Started on 20m and clean band with a few strong sigs and some south American dx with a lot of strong sigs coming from  the western US. Moved to 17m and there were several dx stas, one from Caracas, then on to 15m. 15m had a lot of band noise for some reason, noise absent from the other bands, and there was dx under that noise, infuriatingly. Next tried 10m and a wp4 sta is calling cq on 28412 at 2250Z.
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Offline IZS4

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Re: On the HAM bands
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2020, 1636 UTC »
I got on 17m last week and while viewing the whole band on my SDR and small loop I noticed only one station out of Cuba, but it was very loud. I don't remember the call at the moment. I Was able to get a full exchange. Great signals when there's activity. There is another station out of Cuba that I've worked many times (CO8LY) He's very active and has quite an antenna setup.
Listening on an Icom-718 with a 135' OCF dipole or a RSP2.  Grundig G3 and MLA-30 when portable. When QRP I use a Hendricks PFR-3 I built. Coverage is 20,30 and 40 meters.

Offline Josh

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Re: On the HAM bands
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2020, 2013 UTC »
Always call cq on a seemingly empty band, you never know who is listening.
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Offline IZS4

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Re: On the HAM bands
« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2020, 1131 UTC »
That is very true.
Listening on an Icom-718 with a 135' OCF dipole or a RSP2.  Grundig G3 and MLA-30 when portable. When QRP I use a Hendricks PFR-3 I built. Coverage is 20,30 and 40 meters.

Offline Pigmeat

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Re: On the HAM bands
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2020, 1245 UTC »
Always call cq on a seemingly empty band, you never know who is listening.

Tell me about it. I once heard a weak AM station calling CQ a couple of decades ago. One of the local big dog's answered back and we all got the shock of our lives, the fella who originally called CQ was in Lake Havasu City, AZ.

Offline IZS4

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Re: On the HAM bands
« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2020, 1342 UTC »
There have been some decent openings into Europe lately. Yesterday I worked stations in Switzerland, Slovenia, Hungary on 20m CW. I heard guys that were state side working many others including a mid west station working South Africa. Haven't heard that in a while. Wish I had a Yagi ):
Listening on an Icom-718 with a 135' OCF dipole or a RSP2.  Grundig G3 and MLA-30 when portable. When QRP I use a Hendricks PFR-3 I built. Coverage is 20,30 and 40 meters.