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Author Topic: Pirating in the 11-meter broadcast band?  (Read 1911 times)

Offline Andrew Yoder

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Pirating in the 11-meter broadcast band?
« on: August 06, 2019, 0244 UTC »
I realize that the MUF isn't exactly allowing for it at the moment, but I just wondered how many people have heard pirates within the 11m broadcast band (25600-26100 kHz). I'm starting to write my column for the next Spectrum Monitor. In the last issue, Rob Wagner wrote a column "Whatever Happened to the 11-Meter Band?," so I thought it might be fun to follow it up with an article on 11m pirates. I think the only pirates that I've heard on 26 MHz were Radio Altrex and KROW, but I need to dig through a bunch of newsletters and run searches to see what other stations might be escaping me.
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Offline ThaDood

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Re: Pirating in the 11-meter broadcast band?
« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2019, 1756 UTC »
Well, not me, but someone possibly resembling me, might have considered 26.015MHz AM during E's and last decent F2's. Why there? That's the bottom limit where many of those 12M, 11M, and 10M, export rigs can RX. And??? Heard only once by CB'ers, but not DX. You still have those NBFM auxiliary stations there, and it's nice that WWV is back on 25.00000MHz again. I remember back around 1999, some dude up in Rochester, NY keyed down on a CB channel, (Don't remember which one.), and used it as a broadcast FREQ. Didn't sound like anything fancy, sounded like a CB with a power mic, and that was it. Music was hallow and distorted, and when he announced, he'd bitch at whomever walked in on him yelling, "Shut the f@#$ up! I'm on the air!". Then, after one week, gone. I don't believe that the FCC had anything to do with it. More like someone was either really pissed off, or he burnt up his rig. One advantage that was conceive about pirating on 11M BC band is, when E's, or F2, was hopping, it was difficult to precisely triangulate and locate where the TX could be coming from, unless the monitoring station was within 30 miles, or so. Unlike the lower bands, where a station was a sitting duck. Also, 11M can be had via mobile operations and a 1/4-wave whip. Just, too bad that few DX'ers ever consider looking for pirates up there, but mainly just hear CB outbanders.
I was asked if I liked the 80's pop band The Go-Go's, and I answered that I listened to them, like many other Top 40 pop bands of the time, so Eh. However, I did mention that I did kind of feel sorry for them, since I thought that the band members couldn't have sex. I was then asked, "What do you mean?" My reply was, "Duh... They sing about it themselves, their lips are sealed!".

Offline Josh

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Re: Pirating in the 11-meter broadcast band?
« Reply #2 on: August 06, 2019, 1953 UTC »
A cb set and mobile antenna would make for a dandy local pirate setup. Just drive away from the scene of the crime afterwards.
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Offline R4002

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Re: Pirating in the 11-meter broadcast band?
« Reply #3 on: August 07, 2019, 1540 UTC »
With the recent band openings on 11m it could certainly be done.  I'd stick with frequencies closer to the CB band simply because its easier to get gear/antennas for 25.615 MHz and up.   26.925 MHz / 26925 kHz comes to mind as a frequency to use, simply because its 6925 + 20 MHz (easy to remember).  It is also, however, right next to the often-busy freeband AM DX frequency of 26.915 MHz.  I've heard music within the CB bands during band openings and have found videos online of other DXers hearing music carriers on various 11m frequencies. 

A clearer frequency in the lower 26 MHz area might also be doable. 

11 meter equipment is cheap and readily available and good antennas are considerably smaller than the same performing antenna on 43 meters or 49 meters. 
U.S. East Coast, various HF/VHF/UHF radios/transceivers/scanners/receivers - land mobile system operator - focus on VHF/UHF and 11m

Offline Pigmeat

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Re: Pirating in the 11-meter broadcast band?
« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2019, 0209 UTC »
I've heard a few over the years, Andy, heck, my cousin and I did it as 13 year olds.

The ones I've heard in the past 20-25 years seem to be short-lived stations that don't i.d. One of the odder ones was what I called "Lot Lizard Radio". It was a madam based near a local truckstop who played music and advertised the various charms of her girls. It didn't last long.

Offline Andrew Yoder

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Re: Pirating in the 11-meter broadcast band?
« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2019, 1552 UTC »
Thanks for the input. Good stuff from everyone & I'll probably use a few quotes, if you don't mind (if you don't want me to, let me know)

I know I'm splitting hairs here because I've always considered 11m to be the everything from the 11m broadcast band up through the space just above the CB band. Of course, I'm always interested in hearing stories about pirates broadcasting anywhere, but in this case I'm looking for examples of pirates specifically within just the international broadcast band (25600-26100 kHz).

The one amateur broadcasting proposal from years ago requested LPSW licenses for these frequencies because they were so rarely used by int'l SW stations. Great points by all about equipment, antennas, mobility, etc. Seems like it could be an interesting area for activity
Please QSL to: POB 109, BRS, PA 17214
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Drake R8, AOR AR-7030, R-390A, R-388, SX-28A, Philco 44 + some others    Horizontal loops & 1/2-wave inverted V

Offline R4002

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Re: Pirating in the 11-meter broadcast band?
« Reply #6 on: August 09, 2019, 1351 UTC »
Since most export radios start at 25.615 MHz that gives you the majority of the 11m broadcast band to work with.   I've heard the guys playing music inside the CB band and just above or below the CB band...but as far as 25/26 MHz goes, the only traffic I've heard has been hunters, truckers outside the CB band and Latin American taxi dispatchers.  When the band is open, the 25615 + range is full of ladies speaking Spanish (generally reading numbers) to taxi drivers in AM mode.  The dispatchers often have a distinctive roger beep, maybe to serve as a form of identification for a certain taxi company's drivers.  The A and B bands (25615-26055 and 26065-26505 respectively) seemed to be the busiest areas.  I've heard them inside the CB band before too and on 27515 AM as well as several other freqs above channel 40.

With sporadic-E I don't think you'd have to worry about too much taxi dispatcher QRM in the 25.615 to 26.105 MHz (or 26.100 MHz) region as far as using that for broadcasting goes.  26105 AM / 26.105 MHz is a popular freebander trucker frequency though, so maybe avoid that one.  The "A" channels 25645, 25695, 25745, 25795, 25845 and 26095 might be better bets.   I still like the idea of using 26925 though :D

I like the idea of broadcasting on 11 meters, especially when the band is open, you have the possibility of freebanders becoming "accidental listeners" by coming across your broadcast while tuning around the 11 meter band. 
U.S. East Coast, various HF/VHF/UHF radios/transceivers/scanners/receivers - land mobile system operator - focus on VHF/UHF and 11m

Offline Josh

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Re: Pirating in the 11-meter broadcast band?
« Reply #7 on: August 09, 2019, 1512 UTC »
To maximise the chance someone actually hears you it might be prudent to use the common cb channels and not some freeband freq.
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Offline Brian

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Re: Pirating in the 11-meter broadcast band?
« Reply #8 on: August 09, 2019, 1606 UTC »
To maximise the chance someone actually hears you it might be prudent to use the common cb channels and not some freeband freq.
#
And have every CB vigilante tracking you down........

Offline R4002

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Re: Pirating in the 11-meter broadcast band?
« Reply #9 on: August 10, 2019, 0119 UTC »
I’ve heard music on several of the legal CB channels and freeband frequencies, namely 26.915 AM and 27.555 USB.  Both of those could be considered jamming as the frequencies were active at the time.

I wouldn’t worry about being tracked down, unless you’re jamming channel 19 or a local CB net/local standby channel with nonstop music...long enough for somebody to DF you.
U.S. East Coast, various HF/VHF/UHF radios/transceivers/scanners/receivers - land mobile system operator - focus on VHF/UHF and 11m

 

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