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Author Topic: Some more NDB beacon loggings  (Read 1645 times)

Offline weaksigs

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Some more NDB beacon loggings
« on: December 26, 2011, 1423 UTC »
NDB loggings from early evening listening.
Somehow I always come back to the NDB frequencies when Fall and Winter arrives.

I use to stay up much later and of course things usually get real hot after darkness envelopes in both East and
directions. I use only a passive antenna consisting of a 40 meter loop configured as a long wire. The feed line is
about 100 ft long so the antenna works well when matched using a passive link coupled tuner against a good RF ground.

Still logging the mystery NDB VIEDT as noted and only after sunset. I wonder where this NDB is located?
Anybody else have a logging on this one?

Notes: DDP, DIW and CLB are daytime logging's assuming the noise level is reasonable.

I omitted CLB as it is a powerhouse and it is often 20 db or so above the noise in full sunlight

A few from my log today

UTC   ID       KHZ     Location
0105   QI     207       Yarmouth            Nova Scotia   
0121   CBC     215       CAYMAN BRAC        CAYMAN ISLANDS
0048   ULC     230       Cayo Largo Del Sur CUBA
2140   VIEDT  268       VIEDT  the D has a long dash   UNID        Bad keyer at some airport I suspect
2356   MPG     280       Mérida-Progreso    Mexico
0318   UZG     283       Zaragoza            CUBA
0226  ZIN     376     MATHEWTOWN        Bahamas
0114   UCY     380     Cayajabos        Cuba
0134   SPP     385       SAN ANDRES         COLOMBIA
2255   DDP     391       Dorado                Puerto Rico
2259   CBC     415       Cayman Brac        CAYMAN ISLANDS
0143   HHG     417       Huntington        Indiana
0135   CW     418       Lake Charles        Lousiana
0130   UV     426       OXFORD              Mississippi
2355   PPA     450       Puerto Plata         Dominican Republic
0045   OS     515       Ohio State Univ.   Ohio

Give NDB listening if you haven't as yet.
You may be surprised at what you can hear during the Winter season.
It can be a challenge!

Cheers  ;)
weaksigs
Central Florida
136' random wire for general HF,
Winradio Excalibur G31 & Kenwood TS-590

Peace!

Offline LanceLovejoy

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Re: Some more NDB beacon loggings
« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2011, 1741 UTC »
Nice list!   Colombia and NovaScotia in the same night must keep things interesting for sure, some good hits there!  Definitely worth a listen now and then.  It can be a challenge digging some of those sigs out of the noise, especially when you have two signals on about the same freq competing with eachother, and you've got to wait for one to appear in the space between the other's transmission.    Long live CLB!
Icom R75-wellbrook 330s
St. Louis MO
lancelvj@gmail.com

cmradio

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Re: Some more NDB beacon loggings
« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2011, 0018 UTC »
I should haul out my big loop tonight with those loggings! ;D

Back in '86, I fluked out and logged Concordia, Brazil from Vancouver. With your logs coming near the equator, we may be able to do a repeat ;D

Peace!

Offline weaksigs

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Re: Some more NDB beacon loggings
« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2011, 0234 UTC »
Yes NDB's can be fun while also requiring patience.  >:(
I started logging NDB's and lighthouses from Vermont.
Funny in a way because I used the same type of antenna
in Vermont as I do down here in Florida. My tuner was built
about 1992 and the tapped coil and link arrangement used
a sturdy cardboard tube from a used roll of fax paper for a
coil form.

I do miss the lighthouse radio beacons. They were my
favorites and when hearing them they felt like old friends.

One particular ndb in Venezuela, "HOT", was very strong and
had a distinctive "chirp and whoop". Even when propagation
was marginal it's distinctive signal was a good indicator of
Southern propagation as you could tell it was in there amidst
the other signals even without actually copying its call sign.
It remains one of those pleasant and humorous memories.

I also learned a lot about NDB hunting by reading and re-reading
Sheldon Remington's how to paper. Its very well recommended
and even if you never get hooked on ndb hunting Sheldon
transmitted the listening environment and techniques very well.
If you haven't read this regardless of what your favorite activities
may be you are missing something very important

Get your loops out or active antennas or whatever and give it a go!!

Cheers
weaksigs

Central Florida
136' random wire for general HF,
Winradio Excalibur G31 & Kenwood TS-590

Peace!