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Messages - Σ

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31
I used to have a Radio Shack car alarm that had a remote on 27.145 MHz. Very neat as you could keep the remote in your bedroom and be notified if someone was messing with your vehicle. It wasn't audible at the car so you could catch them in the act.  😀

JTECH had these restaurant pagers on 27 MHz that lead to all kinds of fun uses:
https://kj4vyi.wordpress.com/2011/07/28/10-meter-beacon/

32
HF Beacons / Re: Wild Beacons
« on: September 12, 2018, 1738 UTC »

I like feral... Makes me think of scruffy tough old cats eating out of garbage cans.

Σ, Feral Beacon is kinda interesting.
Does it indicate that the beacon was once a tame pet?
Some of the wild beacons may in fact, be feral beacons, for all we know  ;)

Is Feral Beacon somewhat similar to "Renegade Beacon" ?
Renegade Beacon might describe a beacon that was once law abiding, but now is a solo outlaw beacon, a pirate without a home port.
Almost like Beacons Gone Wild


Feral cats were either abandoned domesticated cats or the progeny of abandoned cats. Feral beacons were once tamed bench oscillators set free into the wild. If you build it out of parts from a domesticated consumer device then you have the progeny.

Renegade beacons should be high powered in-your-face beacons. Thumbing their noses at CFR Title 47 FCC regulations.

Call them what you want... just get some mods posted for the Blackcat Systems Part 22 beacon
(https://blackcatsystems.com/rf-products/22_meter_band_part_15_beacon_kit.html) so the population can explode. :D

33
General Radio Discussion / Re: Do they...
« on: September 11, 2018, 2341 UTC »
My experience has been that because I can solder well I have had numerous opportunities to engage in many part time employment activities. These activities have generated quite a bit of extra money for me simply because the people who hired me didn't have anyone on staff that could solder. I get it that most commodity consumer items are not going to get repaired but there are TONS, and I mean TONS of specialized equipment out there that a) can't have extended down time, b) are likely out of warranty, and c) no longer supported by the manufacturer any more

Manufacturing has quite a lot of this type of equipment for example. Being able to quick fix at the component level... yes, SMD, too... is worth a lot of money to someone who is losing thousands of dollars per hour being down. Since I don't drink coffee (no hand shaking), I can still solder a significant number of SMD parts. Sometimes the repair is as simple as resoldering a cable to get things working again.

So, I agree, consumer items are not hot on the workshop repair list but outside of that arena there are many, many opportunities for a man with a hot iron. The world is much bigger than just the latest iPod or Alexa device. Bottom line is I'm glad I can solder. :)


34
HF Beacons / Re: Wild Beacons
« on: September 11, 2018, 2328 UTC »
I like feral... Makes me think of scruffy tough old cats eating out of garbage cans.

35
General Radio Discussion / Re: Do they...
« on: September 02, 2018, 1729 UTC »
They don't.  In public education the don't because irons are hot and fumes are bad. Suddenly all kids are unable to do basic things that other kids could do decades ago. I know several HS "engineering" teachers that have never soldered before yet they teach electronics. It is dispicable what positive things society forbids kids to do yet promotes so many negative life altering decisions

36
General Radio Discussion / Re: Logging Pirate Radio
« on: August 15, 2018, 1654 UTC »
One additional point...

Some people are restricted as to what kind of station they have. Between antenna, monetary, and spousal restrictions, sometimes you can't put up a receiving station that could hear something less than 50kW.

I have introduced many people to SW listening by showing them rSDR websites. They listen because rSDRs exist since most of these people aren't able to set up a station at home. Pirate stations are much more interesting to them than listening to some power house commercial station and that keeps them going online to catch them.

And then I show them number stations and their curiosity really gets the best of them. :D

37
General Radio Discussion / Re: Logging Pirate Radio
« on: August 15, 2018, 1548 UTC »
I always assumed that the point of broadcasting was to get people to listen to you. ;)

If you log via rSDR then it should be noted as such.

If you can hear a station at home and via rSDR then that becomes two good propagation data points that a broadcaster could use to determine how their signal is getting out. I would think that knowing the general location of both reception points would be useful.

It is like going to the coast to listen to transoceanic MW... you are moving the station physically vs. moving it virtually as you would for a rSDR.

38
I used to listen to NOAA weather radio most mornings (prior to the Internet) while getting ready for work. When I heard other stations creeping in I'd get on 146.52 during the commute and usually get some interesting contacts. There were also a couple of repeaters that would be regularly heard during tropo as well.

NOAA is a good indicator for 2m tropo just like TV Ch 2 used to be an indicator that the 6m band was open.


39
These vans and buses are all over my area. The can be spotted a mile away due to the large low band antenna on their roof. Very solid system as this area is full of hills and valleys that limit higher frequency use in some places.

40
I've always been certain that Earhart survived  for at least 7 to 10 days and the signals heard in the following week were in fact  from her and Fred Noonan.

https://tighar.org/Projects/Earhart/Archives/Research/ResearchPapers/Brandenburg/PostLossSignals/PostLossRadioAnalysis/PostlLossRadioAnalysis.htm





https://tighar.org/Projects/Earhart/Archives/Research/ResearchPapers/Brandenburg/signalcatalog.html


Very interesting reading of the analysis of tidal levels, radio propagation/time of day, and other factors. Thanks for posting.


41
Zendesk is legit... Probably half the companies I deal with at work use that company for help desk and support tickets.

42
Utility / Re: WWV/WWVH 2.5-25 MHz 0025 UTC 22 June 2018
« on: June 29, 2018, 1205 UTC »
Apparently at one point in time WWV transmitted on 30000 and 35000 kHz (30.000 MHz and 35.000 MHz).   

I have never heard of this. Do you know what years they did this in the past?

43
Propagation / Re: Tracking The Solar Downturn
« on: June 21, 2018, 1017 UTC »
Feynman was an interesting guy. Got a set of his red lecture books on the shelf.

44
Very interesting reading at that website. Amazing what can be done when money is no option.


45
SDR - Software Defined Radio / Re: USB Voodoo
« on: April 30, 2018, 1731 UTC »
... and it takes three tries to plug in a USB cable.   ;)

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