We seek to understand and document all radio transmissions, legal and otherwise, as part of the radio listening hobby. We do not encourage any radio operations contrary to regulations. Always consult with the appropriate authorities if you have questions concerning what is permissable in your locale.

Author Topic: Need Help Identifying This Beacon on 6320 kHz  (Read 8545 times)

Offline Strange Beacons

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 216
  • Seattle, WA
    • View Profile
    • Strange Beacons Website
Need Help Identifying This Beacon on 6320 kHz
« on: May 31, 2013, 1833 UTC »
Below is a link to a YouTube video that I created of a shortwave station I discovered on 6320 kHz, broadcasting what sounds like it may (possibly) be pulses from a PACTOR II radio modem, followed by the letters "DLB" in morse code. 

I have not been able to learn anything about this particular transmission after searching online. If anyone has any information, please share it either here or in the comments section of the video. Thank you.

http://youtu.be/30YDLOwYo_s

Offline skeezix

  • Global Moderator
  • DX Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 3691
  • Minneapolis, MN
  • What does 'RNO stand for?
    • View Profile
Re: Need Help Identifying This Beacon on 6320 kHz
« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2013, 0032 UTC »
The CW ID is KLB.

I think what you've found is their PACTOR email service on 6318.0 (ship receive). What mode was your radio in?
http://www.shipcom.com/frequencies.html

Pictures:
http://www.interceptradio.com/wiki/index.php/Marine_Coast_Station_KLB
« Last Edit: June 01, 2013, 0038 UTC by skeezix »
Minneapolis, MN

Offline Strange Beacons

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 216
  • Seattle, WA
    • View Profile
    • Strange Beacons Website
Re: Need Help Identifying This Beacon on 6320 kHz
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2013, 0115 UTC »
Thanks very much for your help, and yes, I think you likely have identified this one, as the links you supplied are very convincing.

I'm going to demonstrate just how much of a total SWL noob I really am by saying that I have no idea what you mean by which "mode" my radio was in.  I was simply auto-scanning the 49 meter band on my cheap Radio Shack PLL portable radio when I found this one.

The CW ID is KLB.

I think what you've found is their PACTOR email service on 6318.0 (ship receive). What mode was your radio in?
http://www.shipcom.com/frequencies.html

Pictures:
http://www.interceptradio.com/wiki/index.php/Marine_Coast_Station_KLB

Offline skeezix

  • Global Moderator
  • DX Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 3691
  • Minneapolis, MN
  • What does 'RNO stand for?
    • View Profile
Re: Need Help Identifying This Beacon on 6320 kHz
« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2013, 0152 UTC »
By mode, I meant is the radio set for AM, USB, LSB, or CW?  For listening to the utility stations (like that one), USB would be the desired mode. Broadcast stations are normally AM. Amateur radio bands under 10 MHz are LSB.

On shortwave, I've found scanning to be fairly useless as the radios don't stop on the weak stations or even the moderately strong stations. If you only care about strong stations, then that's fine, but there's a lot of weak things lurking out there that the radio would never stop on.

The great thing about being a new to this is now you need to listen more for practice.  ;D  


Edit: Looked up that radio and looks like it has AM or SSB (no selection of USB/LSB/CW). From the sound of the video, it sounds like it was in SSB.


« Last Edit: June 01, 2013, 0158 UTC by skeezix »
Minneapolis, MN

Offline Token

  • Global Moderator
  • DX Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 1808
    • View Profile
Re: Need Help Identifying This Beacon on 6320 kHz
« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2013, 0207 UTC »
That is indeed KLB WA.  WLO AL can be heard 1 kHz below it.  The radio says it is tuned to 6320 kHz, but it must be a case of the SSB tuning knob turned hard over to one side or something, KLB is actually on 6318 kHz center frequency (6317 kHz USB tuned freq for 1 kHz CW tones) and WLO is on 6317 kHz center frequency (6316 kHz USB tuned frequency for 1 kHz CW tones).

T!
T!
Mojave Desert, California USA

Offline Strange Beacons

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 216
  • Seattle, WA
    • View Profile
    • Strange Beacons Website
Re: Need Help Identifying This Beacon on 6320 kHz
« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2013, 0226 UTC »
Yes, the radio was in SSB mode (thanks).  I'm going to give another listen for this signal later tonight, but will dial it up on 6318.0 to see if that improves the reception.

Man, I just love this stuff!

By mode, I meant is the radio set for AM, USB, LSB, or CW?  For listening to the utility stations (like that one), USB would be the desired mode. Broadcast stations are normally AM. Amateur radio bands under 10 MHz are LSB.

On shortwave, I've found scanning to be fairly useless as the radios don't stop on the weak stations or even the moderately strong stations. If you only care about strong stations, then that's fine, but there's a lot of weak things lurking out there that the radio would never stop on.

The great thing about being a new to this is now you need to listen more for practice.  ;D  


Edit: Looked up that radio and looks like it has AM or SSB (no selection of USB/LSB/CW). From the sound of the video, it sounds like it was in SSB.




Offline skeezix

  • Global Moderator
  • DX Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 3691
  • Minneapolis, MN
  • What does 'RNO stand for?
    • View Profile
Re: Need Help Identifying This Beacon on 6320 kHz
« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2013, 0234 UTC »
Set it to 6318 and then turn the clarify knob until it sounds good.

There's a lot of fun stuff out there. I was listening to Voice of Greece on 9420 kHz earlier tonight and now listening to a very weak pirate (unlicensed broadcaster) on 6925 USB. Later on, going to see if I can pick up Voice of Korea (DPRK, North Korea) on 15180. They have an English language broadcast at 0400Z (9:00pm PDT), also on 13760 and 11735 kHz at the same time.


In case you haven't found it yet, the following link is pretty good for shortwave broadcast schedules:
http://www.short-wave.info

Minneapolis, MN

Offline Strange Beacons

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 216
  • Seattle, WA
    • View Profile
    • Strange Beacons Website
Re: Need Help Identifying This Beacon on 6320 kHz
« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2013, 1629 UTC »
Great advice, great link, thanks for both.

Set it to 6318 and then turn the clarify knob until it sounds good.

There's a lot of fun stuff out there. I was listening to Voice of Greece on 9420 kHz earlier tonight and now listening to a very weak pirate (unlicensed broadcaster) on 6925 USB. Later on, going to see if I can pick up Voice of Korea (DPRK, North Korea) on 15180. They have an English language broadcast at 0400Z (9:00pm PDT), also on 13760 and 11735 kHz at the same time.


In case you haven't found it yet, the following link is pretty good for shortwave broadcast schedules:
http://www.short-wave.info



Offline BoomboxDX

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 629
    • View Profile
Re: Need Help Identifying This Beacon on 6320 kHz
« Reply #8 on: June 03, 2013, 1614 UTC »
RE: KLB and similar stations using CW markers:
 
Sometimes these marine coastal fixed stations send out their call letters in CW in between FSK bursts.  I used to have fun seeing which ones I could log from other parts of the world, by listening for the CW markers.

In the early 2000's, when I was last interested in utility listening, there were a lot more of these coastal stations doing this. There seem to be less of them doing this now.
An AM radio Boombox DXer.
+ GE SRIII, PR-D5 & TRF on MW.
The usual Realistic culprits on SW (and a Panasonic).

Offline jFarley

  • Global Moderator
  • DX Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 5809
  • near Chicago
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Need Help Identifying This Beacon on 6320 kHz
« Reply #9 on: June 03, 2013, 2050 UTC »
Boombox;

For me, DXing and verifying the MM Coastal stations was a hobby within the hobby.  I found it to be relaxing and a great way to decompress from the rigors of SWBC DX, the reports were pretty easy to put together, and the verification rate I found to be rather high.  There were so many great DX targets in countries which otherwise would be very difficult if not impossible to hear via SWBC.  As a bonus, it was a great way to pick up some CW reading skill.  Some of the QSLs are real classics.

LF NDBs are challenging, but I really miss these guys.
Joe Farley, Near Chicago
SDR-IQ / R8 / R7
Remote Resonant Loops for HF and LF / ALA 1530
Active 60" Whip / PA0RDT
QSLS appreciated to:    jfarley44@att.net

Offline skeezix

  • Global Moderator
  • DX Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 3691
  • Minneapolis, MN
  • What does 'RNO stand for?
    • View Profile
Re: Need Help Identifying This Beacon on 6320 kHz
« Reply #10 on: June 04, 2013, 0117 UTC »
Back in the late 80's/early 90's, I used to grab the RTTY from the ships. My favorites were when they'd send in their grocery lists. There was one where they wanted over 900 eggs (the rest of the list was of very large quantities too). Printed that thing out... but unfortunately, its long gone.
Minneapolis, MN

Offline Strange Beacons

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 216
  • Seattle, WA
    • View Profile
    • Strange Beacons Website
Re: Need Help Identifying This Beacon on 6320 kHz
« Reply #11 on: June 04, 2013, 1532 UTC »
I got a good chuckle out of this! I sailed with the US Coast Guard and merchant marine for 15 years and I suppose it is possible that one of your "grabbed grocery lists" could possibly have come from a ship I was on. Yeah, 900 eggs seems like a lot, but it is nothing when it comes to feeding a hungry ships crew on a daily basis.

Back in the late 80's/early 90's, I used to grab the RTTY from the ships. My favorites were when they'd send in their grocery lists. There was one where they wanted over 900 eggs (the rest of the list was of very large quantities too). Printed that thing out... but unfortunately, its long gone.


Offline Strange Beacons

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 216
  • Seattle, WA
    • View Profile
    • Strange Beacons Website
Re: Need Help Identifying This Beacon on 6320 kHz
« Reply #12 on: June 04, 2013, 1739 UTC »
Here is a link to an .mp3 file that I found at Archive.org, featuring a recording of a KLB voice message: http://archive.org/download/ShortwaveOddsSodsTransmissions/MaritimeStationUnidPolytone8806khz1905z-1907z01-10-11.mp3

The CW ID is KLB.

I think what you've found is their PACTOR email service on 6318.0 (ship receive). What mode was your radio in?
http://www.shipcom.com/frequencies.html

Pictures:
http://www.interceptradio.com/wiki/index.php/Marine_Coast_Station_KLB

Offline jFarley

  • Global Moderator
  • DX Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 5809
  • near Chicago
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Need Help Identifying This Beacon on 6320 kHz
« Reply #13 on: June 04, 2013, 2058 UTC »
Probably a good time to mark your calendars for NIGHT OF NIGHTS XIV July 12, 2013.

http://www.nps.gov/pore/planyourvisit/events_nightofnights.htm
Joe Farley, Near Chicago
SDR-IQ / R8 / R7
Remote Resonant Loops for HF and LF / ALA 1530
Active 60" Whip / PA0RDT
QSLS appreciated to:    jfarley44@att.net