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Author Topic: 17450 WhatzIT?  (Read 1149 times)

rdla4

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17450 WhatzIT?
« on: October 04, 2014, 1440 UTC »
Very broad, each signal slowly increases in amplitude, while it moves up in frequency, then reduces amplitutue.

Very rich 500hz harmonics in the audio passband.

1440 10/4/14
« Last Edit: October 04, 2014, 1442 UTC by rdla4 »

rdla4

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Re: 17450 WhatzIT?
« Reply #1 on: October 04, 2014, 1444 UTC »
The waterfall from this signal:

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Re: 17450 WhatzIT?
« Reply #2 on: October 04, 2014, 1710 UTC »
This is a radar, and I am pretty sure it is the SKiYMET meteor radar.  There are multiple sites around the World using this radar or systems derived from / near identical to it.  As near as I can tell there are three primary frequencies used by these radars, 17450 kHz, 29850 kHz, and 35420 kHz.  Other freqs are possible, indeed listed as used, but those are the most common I see at my location.  It looks like the hardware can support up to around 60 MHz operation.

Most radars you see on HF today tend to use FMCW techniques, but this one is a simple shaped pulse (shaped to reduce bandwidth) system.

This PDF contains some information and a map of some of the locations for SKiYMET:
http://spacedynamics.org/capabilities/bearlake/meteor-radar/Mardoc.pdf

T!
T!
Mojave Desert, California USA

rdla4

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Re: 17450 WhatzIT?
« Reply #3 on: October 04, 2014, 1958 UTC »
Excellent information, Thank You!!!