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Author Topic: CW on 11175 kHz  (Read 4498 times)

Offline IZ5PQT

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CW on 11175 kHz
« on: April 04, 2015, 1222 UTC »
Hearing now since several minutes a CW emission on 11175.8 kHz (around 1210 UTC). Weak but readable (but not decodable by me :-\)
Any idea of what could it be?
I found a 2013 post somewhere mentioning it but no explanation.
I thought CW code was no longer in use except for hams.

73 Giovanni
TXRX: IC-765ProIII
RX: R-5000, ELAD-S2,FRG-7, several SONY ICF-7600...
Antenna: 30 m longwire antenna, PA0RDT Miniwhip
QTH: Pisa, Italy, JN53er

Offline Token

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Re: CW on 11175 kHz
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2015, 1422 UTC »
CW is still a valid mode.  Militaries still use it, maritime still uses it, intelligence services still use it.  And of course, hams still use it.

With regard to CW just above 11175 kHz, without further detail than just a frequency you probably will not get a good answer.  It could be an out of band station from anther service, it could be someone messing around on / near the HF-GCS freqs, etc.  With a recordings or format used (callsign etc) we might be able to narrow it down some.

T!
T!
Mojave Desert, California USA

Offline laughing man

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Re: CW on 11175 kHz
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2015, 1738 UTC »
Interesting because 11175 kHz is the US EAM, you know... "Skyking Skyking do not answer"
That is one of their frequencies the other being 8992 kHz

Offline Token

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Re: CW on 11175 kHz
« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2015, 1403 UTC »
Interesting because 11175 kHz is the US EAM, you know... "Skyking Skyking do not answer"
That is one of their frequencies the other being 8992 kHz

11175 and 8992 kHz USB are the two primary 24 hour frequencies of the US Military HF-GCS network.  However there are other frequencies used also, 4724, 6712, 6739, 8992, 11175, 13200, and 15016 kHz are all used simultaneously and 24 hours a day.  Many messages are simulcast on all frequencies at the same time.

EAMs are not the only traffic you will hear on those frequencies.  Standard traffic, phone patches, FDMs, EAMs, and Skykings can all be heard, every day, multiple times a day.

But keep in mind, just because the HF-GCS network uses a frequency does not mean they "own" the frequency.  There is nothing to stop other militaries from also using the same frequencies.  And it is not uncommon to hear south American and Pacific maritime stations on these frequencies.  Technically they may be radio pirates, but they often don't seem to care what freqs they use.

The end result is that not all traffic heard when you are tuned to an HF-GCS frequency is actually part of the network or from any source related to the network.  The CW could have been form any place or any source, however the HF-GCS network is not noted for using CW, so it is unlikely it was actually related to that network.

T!
T!
Mojave Desert, California USA