We seek to understand and document all radio transmissions, legal and otherwise, as part of the radio listening hobby. We do not encourage any radio operations contrary to regulations. Always consult with the appropriate authorities if you have questions concerning what is permissable in your locale.

Author Topic: 13.560 MHz  (Read 4063 times)

Offline jordan

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 51
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
13.560 MHz
« on: July 17, 2015, 0006 UTC »
There are SW transmitters being sold on eBay that operate in the ISM band, or 13.560 MHz.  Would these be feasible to use as pirate shortwave AM transmitters?  They would need to be modified for higher power output, of course, as they come with only 100mW power output.

But is 13.560 MHz a common pirate frequency in general?

Offline ff

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 443
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • Upstate NY
    • View Profile
Re: 13.560 MHz
« Reply #1 on: July 17, 2015, 1232 UTC »
Short answer - no.  I have a few friends who are beating each other to death with beacons on 13560 because "it's legal".  Problem is, it's not practical.  There's a bazillion others with the same idea and they're all scrunched up into this one little spectrum slice trying to be heard.  As for plunking down there with more power, well, I guess you can imagine all the wrong kind of attention you'd be attracting.  As for 22 meters in general, I have used it intermittently for years, especially 13605 and 13675 and have had reasonable success with it during late afternoons and early evenings.  But I will add my usual caveat - if you operate in any areas besides 43M (or 48M in Europe) your reception reports will be far, far less.  Not because you aren't getting out, but because few will be actively looking for small pirate signals elsewhere in the HF bands.
Hailing from the upstate boondocks region of the progressive paradise which once was New York State

Offline jordan

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 51
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: 13.560 MHz
« Reply #2 on: July 17, 2015, 2142 UTC »
OK, so I guess I should just stick with the 6900 kHz band. 

Another question: Would a Yaesu amateur HF rig be the best transmitter to use for this?  Or is there something better?  I would only be operating in AM, not SSB, since I would be broadcasting music.

Offline uhf35

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 13
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: 13.560 MHz
« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2015, 2357 UTC »
OK, so I guess I should just stick with the 6900 kHz band. 

Another question: Would a Yaesu amateur HF rig be the best transmitter to use for this?  Or is there something better?  I would only be operating in AM, not SSB, since I would be broadcasting music.

In theory, the amateur HF transceivers are suitable for "continuous" service... but... the problem is to define that we call "continuous service." Sincerely, in my opinion, build an HF-AM Tx is relatively simple and cheaper than use a high electronic technology transceiver to make these kind of transmissions...

Offline jordan

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 51
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: 13.560 MHz
« Reply #4 on: July 18, 2015, 0147 UTC »
OK, so I guess I should just stick with the 6900 kHz band. 

Another question: Would a Yaesu amateur HF rig be the best transmitter to use for this?  Or is there something better?  I would only be operating in AM, not SSB, since I would be broadcasting music.

In theory, the amateur HF transceivers are suitable for "continuous" service... but... the problem is to define that we call "continuous service." Sincerely, in my opinion, build an HF-AM Tx is relatively simple and cheaper than use a high electronic technology transceiver to make these kind of transmissions...


OK, cool!  Do you have any plans or schematics that I can look at?  What about suggested part numbers for the components (resistors, capacitors, transistors, etc.)?

Offline ff

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 443
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • Upstate NY
    • View Profile
Re: 13.560 MHz
« Reply #5 on: July 18, 2015, 1228 UTC »
Jordan - go to the "BLACK ARTS" section of this board.  A thorough reading should answer most of your questions and provide links to most of the - proven - easily built rig schematics out there. 

If your skill level is low but you have money to burn, an old factory-built rig might be the better choice.  UHF35's concerns are valid but there are some exceptions.  Back in the early 90s ICOM introduced the IC-735.  It was advertised as being engineered and built to withstand hour-long keydown periods.  Many ops like Anteater Radio used these rigs and - yes - they proved to be quite robust and would withstand that kind of service.  Also, old tube rigs usually will hold up well - if - you don't attempt to use them at full power (treat those old transformers well!).  Hamfests and ebay are the obvious places to look for old rigs.  And if you buy one that hasn't been recapped, then by all means, build on your confidence and skill level by recapping it. 

I agree with UHF35 that building is definitely easier, but only for builders.  If you have little building experience, it might take you several years to work up to the skill level required.  Soldering something together is easy.  Debugging that homebrewed gaggle of non-working components usually isn't :) Whatever way you decide to proceed, I suggest that you start studying.  You'll never learn what you need to know from reading posts.  This is an ART and must be PRACTICED to become proficient.  Crack those books...
Hailing from the upstate boondocks region of the progressive paradise which once was New York State

Offline uhf35

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 13
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: 13.560 MHz
« Reply #6 on: July 19, 2015, 0556 UTC »
Jordan - go to the "BLACK ARTS" section of this board.  A thorough reading should answer most of your questions and provide links to most of the - proven - easily built rig schematics out there.  

If your skill level is low but you have money to burn, an old factory-built rig might be the better choice.  UHF35's concerns are valid but there are some exceptions.  Back in the early 90s ICOM introduced the IC-735.  It was advertised as being engineered and built to withstand hour-long keydown periods.  Many ops like Anteater Radio used these rigs and - yes - they proved to be quite robust and would withstand that kind of service.  Also, old tube rigs usually will hold up well - if - you don't attempt to use them at full power (treat those old transformers well!).  Hamfests and ebay are the obvious places to look for old rigs.  And if you buy one that hasn't been recapped, then by all means, build on your confidence and skill level by recapping it.  

I agree with UHF35 that building is definitely easier, but only for builders.  If you have little building experience, it might take you several years to work up to the skill level required.  Soldering something together is easy.  Debugging that homebrewed gaggle of non-working components usually isn't :) Whatever way you decide to proceed, I suggest that you start studying.  You'll never learn what you need to know from reading posts.  This is an ART and must be PRACTICED to become proficient.  Crack those books...

I absolutely agree, ff.

Jordan, to start: go to "black arts." Learns basic electronics and components; safety; how to interpretate the schemes; etc. Then ask to Google by, example, the Radio Diablo Shortwave Transmitters (does not mean that you will necessarily use it to transmit, but you have to start building something, and better be something cheaply if something goes wrong the first few times.) Years ago, I begun with these "arts" with the R. Diablo 3 watts IRF520 MOSFET transmitter without major issues, not more than get T50-2 toroids and to adapt some transformers to audio modulation.

Another similar are "Corsette." The "Corsair", "Commando" and "Grenade" are more difficult.

Then ask how to build toroidal core transformers (in order to match impedance between stages) CORRECTLY; how to soldering; how to estimate transmitter power based on levels of voltage; how to make filters, how to build wire dipoles and line adapters, etc.

From zero, it's a long way, but you will walk by an fantastic and amazing road.

You have an enormously advantage: languaje and country. When I began, 15 years ago, I knew a little English (the languaje of the majority of technical papers authors), and  also, in south america was some difficult to get some exotic (for here) RF parts.

Good luck!  ;D
« Last Edit: July 19, 2015, 0558 UTC by uhf35 »