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Author Topic: UHF mil air  (Read 34700 times)

Offline Josh

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Re: UHF mil air
« Reply #285 on: September 24, 2018, 2328 UTC »
226.300 AM 2319Z 24SEP18
Pilot talking about ejecting, freq comes up as Bloomington Ground / Midway Tower. Dunno wtf is going on.
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Offline Josh

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Re: UHF mil air
« Reply #286 on: September 28, 2018, 1903 UTC »
Neacp/tacamo/glass flight burning mux on 366.6MHz 1829Z 28SEP18.
Modem traffic on one orderwire. Qsy from 307.100 possibly.
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Offline Josh

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Re: UHF mil air
« Reply #287 on: October 02, 2018, 1558 UTC »
AR455 ongoing 336.100MHz 1540Z 02OCT18
TOPCAT5 practicing emergency separation.
82 has you loud and clear, clear astern.
Seat swaps indicating multiple pilots to be trained in refueling.
Track runs over most of Ky.
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Offline Josh

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Re: UHF mil air
« Reply #288 on: October 03, 2018, 1840 UTC »
AR315 ongoing 343.250MHz 1740Z 03OCT18
SENTRY30 awacs
HAPPY61 tanker


61; clear to contact
30; three zero contact

61; we'd like to terminate training
30; six one, three zero, one more seat swap if that's ok
61; one more is fine

30; six one, three zero, request clear astern
61; six one clear astern

61; three zero, after emergency separate called by boom operator would like to call it a day
30; three zero copies
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Offline Josh

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Re: UHF mil air
« Reply #289 on: October 07, 2018, 2013 UTC »
Neacp/tacamo/glass flight burning mux on 366.6MHz 1700Z 07OCT18.
Ssb voice and psk modem on orderwires.
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Offline Josh

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Re: UHF mil air
« Reply #290 on: October 09, 2018, 1802 UTC »
Neacp/tacamo/glass flight burning mux on 338.950MHz 1729Z 10OCT18.
Modem traffic on one orderwire.
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Offline Josh

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Re: UHF mil air
« Reply #291 on: October 14, 2018, 2039 UTC »
Neacp/tacamo/glass flight burning mux on 338.950MHz 2029Z 14OCT18.
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Offline autovon

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Re: UHF mil air
« Reply #292 on: October 16, 2018, 1540 UTC »
396.2 MHz Air-Air refueling w/ Chill xx B-52 and Mash 81 KC-135 on AR406 (S Neb/S Iowa)
323.8 MHz EAM now at 1545z
311.3 MHz Lobos F-16s in the Crypt MOA (W Iowa) refueling with Husker 15 KC-135
« Last Edit: October 16, 2018, 1548 UTC by autovon »
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Offline R4002

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Re: UHF mil air
« Reply #293 on: October 16, 2018, 1550 UTC »
396.200 MHz!

Is there still extensive use of the 380-400 MHz portion now that military UHF-low Project 25 digital trunking land mobile systems use this frequency range as well? 

It's 380-390 MHz for the repeater outputs and 390-400 MHz for the inputs, save for 14 channels assigned as "Intra-Squad Radio" (basically Icom FRS HTs with military frequencies programmed in them - the Civil Air Patrol are/were known users).  Apparently there are also extensive use of Motorola XTS2500 series radios (380 MHz to 430 MHz UHF low split) used one the P25 UHF low systems and for ISR purposes. 

Intra Squad Radio
Channel 1 - 396.875 MHz
Channel 2 - 397.125 MHz
Channel 3 - 397.175 MHz
Channel 4 - 397.375 MHz
Channel 5 - 397.425 MHz
Channel 6 - 397.475 MHz
Channel 7 - 397.550 MHz
Channel 8 - 397.950 MHz
Channel 9 - 398.050 MHz
Channel 10 - 399.425 MHz
Channel 11 - 399.475 MHz
Channel 12 - 399.725 MHz
Channel 13 - 399.925 MHz
Channel 14 - 399.975 MHz

The 380-400 MHz trunking systems use 12.5 kHz spacing so the potential for interference with aircraft comms exists.  I was under the impression that military aircraft frequencies in the 380-400 range had moved down below 380.000 MHz
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Offline autovon

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Re: UHF mil air
« Reply #294 on: October 17, 2018, 0112 UTC »
1.  There are still a few aircraft frequencies still in use up there, both on the tactical side and ATC side.   I don't think there was the mass exodus as propagated on various milair message boards and email lists. 

2. The ISR radios/frequencies were a someones good idea fairy that don't really get used.
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Offline R4002

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Re: UHF mil air
« Reply #295 on: October 17, 2018, 1310 UTC »
Right.  I think the ISR was more an answer to the military using off the shelf FRS radios (which is apparently strictly forbidden).  As long as they're not close to a 380 MHz - 400 MHz LMR system operating near the aircraft freq in question I suppose there's no reason to move down below 380.000 MHz. 
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Offline autovon

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Re: UHF mil air
« Reply #296 on: October 17, 2018, 1336 UTC »
Yeah, I imagine what happens is many didn't move unless the user reported interference.   There was a form that NITA frequency users could fill out for things like interference.  That would go to whatever hole that government forms go to to hopefully get solved in a few decades.
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Offline R4002

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Re: UHF mil air
« Reply #297 on: October 17, 2018, 1343 UTC »
Here are the two larger UHF-low 380-400 MHz military LMR trunking systems in operation...

United States Department of Defense [System 14C] - http://www.radioreference.com/apps/db/?sid=3856

Joint National Capital Region [not just around the DC area] - http://www.radioreference.com/apps/db/?sid=4699

The US Department of Defense system is massive, but there are several other regional and local systems using the same 380 MHz range that are either linked to each other or stand alone for whichever reason.  There is still extensive government use of the 406-420 MHz range, whereas 380-400 MHz is apparently military only.
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Offline Josh

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Re: UHF mil air
« Reply #298 on: October 17, 2018, 1843 UTC »
"I think the ISR was more an answer to the military using off the shelf FRS radios (which is apparently strictly forbidden)"

Not anymore. COTS is the new milspec. Commercial Off The Shelf. If it's mission capable, it gets bought.
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Offline Josh

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Re: UHF mil air
« Reply #299 on: October 17, 2018, 1850 UTC »
271.400 1848Z 17OCT18 Air to Air chat
No callsigns, referred to Terre Haute (50 miles north of qth).

If there was any way to get out of the military and paid to coach, or work at an airline.

You mean like at a high school?

Yeah coach football at a highschool.

Sounds like single seaters due to mask noise as well as jet engine sound; A10s, fighters, etc.
« Last Edit: October 17, 2018, 1856 UTC by Josh »
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