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Author Topic: 6905 kHz LSB Spanish Freebanders (were on 6900 LSB) 1342 UTC+ 26 Oct 2017  (Read 296 times)

Offline R4002

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See log for 6900 kHz LSB 1300 UTC + 26 Oct 2017:
https://www.hfunderground.com/board/index.php/topic,38242.0.html

It appears that the antenna discussion that was previously heard on 6900 LSB has QSY'd up one channel (5 kHz channel steps anyway) to 6905 kHz LSB.  The stronger station (we'll say "Station A") is talking very fast.  His accent is hard for me to recognize but does not sound like the usual slower Mexican accents usually heard on 6900 kHz LSB.  It appears that right now (1344-1345 UTC) he is reading his cell phone number over the air (!!!) to continue this antenna conversation.  This guy is Elmering for another freeband operator, helping him with his antenna problems.  At 1346, "el Antena Tuner" heard.  Then, also at 1346, the second, slower speaking station "Station B" is slowly reading through what sounds like a manual or instructions on using an antenna tuner.  Fascinating stuff.   Station B is now talking about his radio (Yaesu mentioned, didn't catch model number).   

As of 1350 UTC, the QSO is continuing.  They likely moved off 6900 LSB due to heavier traffic on that frequency.

Not only is Station A helping Station B (as of 1348 UTC, no names or other IDs have been heard) with his antenna setup, but they have QSY'd from the primary frequency of 6900 kHz LSB in order to continue their technical conversation.  This is very professional and I can't say the same about some ham operators operating within the ham bands.  Start your QSO on the calling frequency...and then QSY!  These guys may be looked down upon by ham operators because they're operating out of band and by US based listeners in general as more of an annoyance speaking a foreign language, but the more I listen to the 6900 kHz group, the more I respect them as radio operators. 
U.S. East Coast, various HF/VHF/UHF radios/scanners/receivers