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Author Topic: Russian and Ukrainian Freebanders 3 MHz Band AM Mode (via SDRs) 6-7 Dec 2018  (Read 57 times)

Offline R4002

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Via a KiwiSDR in Lutsk, Ukraine I can hear several informal CB-like QSOs in the 2-4 MHz band, with most activity centering around 3 MHz or 3000 kHz.  The transmitters seem to all be off-frequency, sometimes by as many as 2-3 kHz and there isn't really a band plan or channeling like there is with CB...but otherwise this sounds just like CB. 

The signals are in AM mode, with significant variation in modulation level, audio quality and bandwidth.

3053 kHz - Russian or Ukrainian OMs chatting, very good signals, one of the transmitters is on 3053.1 kHz, another one 3053.5
3073 kHz - S9+10db very good signal, 10-15 kHz wide AM, two ops, one on 3073.2 kHz, the other on 3073.4 kHz
3086 kHz - distorted audio, but strong signals, several stations chatting, one is on 3088 kHz, another on 3085 kHz
3100 kHz - more strong audio, with the usual frequency variation and wide AM signals
3113 kHz - very busy, more CB-like chatter and some dead carriers too, one on 3113.4 kHz
3120 kHz - another busy frequency, with lots of variation in frequency, one guy was down on 3117 kHz
3131 kHz - 3132 kHz vs. 3130 kHz, two replies to one transmission, you can see one of them swing up in freq. when the mic is keyed
3144 kHz or 3145 kHz - more of the same, 2-4 MHz Russian AM traffic...I wonder if these ops are using surplus military gear
3156 kHz - VERY strong (S9+20db) signal 3156.9 kHz at 2213 UTC (0013 local time) QRM from 3160 kHz
3160 kHz - weak carrier with some modulation, getting obliterated by the 3156 kHz / 3157 kHz crowd
3185 kHz - carrier on 3185.1 kHz, good signal with strong modulation, reminds me of 27025 AM when the band is busy

There were plenty of other signals nearby as well.  I'm hearing a CB-like QSO on 2920 kHz USB at 2216 UTC, but it could very well be marine traffic.  Lots of FSK and other data signals and 80 meters is very busy too.  Siren-sounding signal on 3012 kHz USB and shortly after that the AM signals start as you go higher in frequency...
U.S. East Coast, various HF/VHF/UHF radios/scanners/receivers - VHF LMR network operator

Offline Exo

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Via a KiwiSDR in Lutsk, Ukraine I can hear several informal CB-like QSOs in the 2-4 MHz band, with most activity centering around 3 MHz or 3000 kHz.  The transmitters seem to all be off-frequency, sometimes by as many as 2-3 kHz and there isn't really a band plan or channeling like there is with CB...but otherwise this sounds just like CB.   

Seems like marine or other local traffic using the old Trawler Band (1.6 MHz ~ 3.3 MHz) marine AM sets.
Fond memories of listening to fishing vessels in the 1960s, when the Trawler Band in the Gulf of Mexico was very active with these kinds of drifting AM transmissions back then. Or perhaps it was just that old receiver that was drifting :)
« Last Edit: December 07, 2018, 0656 UTC by Exo »
Exo
HF aficionado. On the coast of northern California.
Various receivers, transceivers, and broadband antennas.
kiwiSDR receiver on private LAN for multi-freq HF monitoring.

Offline R4002

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Marine traffic would actually make a lot of sense.  Lots of banter heard and the AM signals were all at least a couple hundred Hz away from each other.  One of the transmitters would "swing" up about 300-400 Hz when first keyed up.  Could very well be maritime signals using older-generation gear.  I didn't notice any AM voice traffic above 3.3 MHz or 3300 kHz either.  There was the lone USB QSO on 2920 kHz which I presumed to be maritime as well.  I know that the old marine band is still heavily used in Europe for weather broadcasts and ship-to-ship comms.  Apparently QRM from ship to ship QSOs in 160 meters and 80 meters is a significant problem for European amateurs as well.
U.S. East Coast, various HF/VHF/UHF radios/scanners/receivers - VHF LMR network operator