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Author Topic: The Penguin threat still exists!!!  (Read 1218 times)

Fansome

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The Penguin threat still exists!!!
« on: February 29, 2012, 0900 UTC »
I spent years trying to crush the Penguin on the old FRN chatroom. Now, here I see that she is coming back to life. I blame Bohemian, and the old, decrepit Pirate, Pigmeat. This is an existential threat.

Scientists reconstruct extinct giant penguin

The Associated Press

Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2012 | 11:26 p.m.

It has taken 26 million years, but scientists say getting the first glimpse at what a long-extinct giant penguin looked like was worth the wait.

Experts from New Zealand and the United States have reconstructed the fossil skeleton of one of the giant sea birds for the first time, revealing long wings, a slender build and a spear-like bill that have them describing it as one elegant bird.

In research published this week in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, the scientists say the bird they have dubbed Kairuku _ Maori for "diver who returns with food" _ stood about 4 feet 2 inches (1.3 meters) tall and had a body shape unique from any previously known penguin, living or extinct. Kairuku lived in the Oligocene period, about 26 million years ago.

The first Kairuku bones were discovered 35 years ago in New Zealand by Ewan Fordyce, a professor of geology at New Zealand's University of Otago. He recently teamed up with Dan Ksepka, a research assistant professor at North Carolina State University, to reconstruct a skeleton from multiple sets of fossils, using a king penguin as a model.

"It's pretty exciting," Fordyce told The Associated Press. "We've got enough from three key specimens to get a pretty reliable construction of its body size."

Fordyce said the bird's elongated bill may have been useful in catching swift prey and its large body size likely helped it swim longer distances and dive deeper than modern-day penguins.

The bird is about a foot (30 centimeters) taller than the largest modern-day penguin, the emperor. It would have weighed about 132 pounds (60 kilograms), 50 percent more than an emperor.

When Kairuku was alive, most of modern-day New Zealand was submerged beneath the ocean. The scientists believe the remaining isolated, rocky land masses helped keep the penguins safe from potential predators and provided them with plentiful supplies of food.

Fordyce said there are several reasons why the giant penguins might have become extinct: It could have been from climate change, the arrival of new predators, or increased competition for food from seals and other creatures.


Offline Jolly Roger

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Re: The Penguin threat still exists!!!
« Reply #1 on: February 29, 2012, 1527 UTC »
Fordyce said there are several reasons why the giant penguins might have become extinct: It could have been from climate change, the arrival of new predators, or increased competition for food from seals and other creatures.


  Perhaps an insecure prehistoric rabbit just made his life unbearable?
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Offline Pigmeat

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Re: The Penguin threat still exists!!!
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2012, 0452 UTC »
Don't drag me into this,Fansome,you antagonized them.

Offline Pigmeat

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Re: The Penguin threat still exists!!!
« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2012, 2118 UTC »
Al,I was watching a PBS show on penguins the other night. It seems they've made it to the Galapagos Islands,just north of the equator. If they've made it that far,is it long before they sneak ashore in Pismo Beach in great swarms,disguised as oversized grunion?