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Author Topic: Any practical way for part 15 broadcasting in Canada?  (Read 1067 times)

Offline Shortwave_Listener

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Any practical way for part 15 broadcasting in Canada?
« on: March 03, 2022, 1655 UTC »
I am interested in part 15 broadcasting but I live in Canada. I know that supposedly under BETS-1 or RSS-210 your transmitters need to be certified for use even if they fit the technical requirements. The only certified transmitters I can find are the ones made by decade transmitters and procaster which are ridiculously expensive. I have seen some posts on part15.org that say that RSS-210 isnít for broadcasting (only for your own reception) but annex B (Devices operating in frequency bands for any application) states "This annex provides the technical requirements for devices operating in various frequency bands for any application." I also know unlicensed hobbyist beacons are legal in Canada and they donít sell them pre made so they canít be approved. Personal FM transmitters (like the ones used to transmit audio from a MP3 player to a car radio) are also legal here. So my question is, are there any affordable part 15 equivalents in Canada? Would there be any issues using a transmitter from the US like the talking house? I am interested in all bands HF and below as well as the FM broadcast band (160-190 kHz, 510-1705 kHz, 6780 kHz, 13560 kHz, and 88-108 MHz).
Songs are identified with Shazam if needed. I usually use KiwiSDR receivers. Reception from my QTH is using a Sony ICF-2010 with a 25 meter (80 ft) longwire antenna in a tree.
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Offline ThaDood

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Re: Any practical way for part 15 broadcasting in Canada?
« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2022, 1835 UTC »
My Part #15-like equivalent knowledge for Canada is limited, but I believe that Carrier-Current Operations are permissible there, a.k.a coupling to the power lines. From 160kHz - 190kHz, the quickest way to get-on-air fairly cheaply are those so-called wireless intercoms that use the house wiring. I had a pair of Novis FM Intercoms that went way further than the inside wiring. That rated 10mW output went down the street for hundreds of meters. You can also do AM Carrier-Current on the AM broadcast band and Neutral Couple to the AC Power Neutral. I do that. As far as a certified transmitter for that in Canada? You may have to roll your own transmitter there. However, 1W, or less, coupled to the lines may cover a whole neighborhood, and even beyond. Hope that helps. 
Since I did electrical training, for being an electrician, decades ago, I thought that I could always fall-back on that. Besides, what other field can you use trade terms like nipples, hickeys, and making male / female connections, without getting into trouble at work?

Offline Shortwave_Listener

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Re: Any practical way for part 15 broadcasting in Canada?
« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2022, 1815 UTC »
Is making your own transmitters for part 15 legal here? I can seem to find anything in the official rules for RSS-210 (which isnít broadcasting anyway, personal use only) or BETS-1 (broadcasting). Canít they just have the same rules as the USA  ::)
Songs are identified with Shazam if needed. I usually use KiwiSDR receivers. Reception from my QTH is using a Sony ICF-2010 with a 25 meter (80 ft) longwire antenna in a tree.
Shortwave Radio Archive: https://www.youtube.com/@SW_Archive
https://archive.org/details/@shortwave_radio_archive

Offline secretlab

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Re: Any practical way for part 15 broadcasting in Canada?
« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2022, 0943 UTC »
The only Industry Canada certified AM transmitter I'm aware of is the Chez Radio Procaster. It's not cheap, but it's a solid design that works very well.

Likewise, Canada based Decade makes certified FM transmitters which can operate at the more generous power level enjoyed by you lucky folks north of the border.
ICOM IC-7300, Chameleon EMCOMMII 60' inverted L, HF+ Discovery, MFJ-1886 rotatable RX loop. Portable: Xiegu X6100, mcHF, Chameleon CHA-TDL delta loop, wires.

 


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