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Author Topic: 11 meter DX Logs 4 March 2016 1900 UTC +  (Read 3705 times)

Offline R4002

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11 meter DX Logs 4 March 2016 1900 UTC +
« on: March 04, 2016, 2140 UTC »
Some Sporadic-E and maybe F2 propagation going on this afternoon:

Standard 6-band "export" configuration below.  To compute "bands", simply add or subtract 450 kHz depending on if you're going up or down from the CB band (usually Band D on most exports).  Of course, many exports are being sold with wider coverage.  Ranging from 25615-30105 to 26065-28755 to 24265-29655.  So the CB band could be anywhere from "Band C" to "Band F" depending on what radio you're using.  

Just to make things more confusing, there is also the UK FM "27/81" allocation with weird offset (and FM mode only) from 27601.25-27991.25.  On top of that you have the UK's CADS and Ireland's WPAS (Church services relay) services on the regular 26965-27405 band and on two overlapping sets of 40 channels each, the UK FM allocation 27601.25-27991.25 (both AM and FM allowed in Ireland) and another set of 40 channels from 27605-27995 (both AM and FM allowed).  One can imagine how easily 27601.25 could turn into 27600.

In Russia, Poland and most of Eastern Europe there are two overlapping sets of channels.  The "standard" or "fives" offset (e.g. 27305 for channel 30) and the "Russian" or "Polish" or "zeros" offset (e.g. 27300 for channel 30).  Many radios being sold in that part of the world offer a -5kHz switch in addition to the +10kHz switch to reach the offset frequencies.  

Band A - "Super-Low" 25615-26055
Band B - "Low-Low" 26065-26505
Band C - "Low Band" 26515-26955 - Latin Americans are found on this band, usually in AM mode.  US stations can be found in the high portions, usually from 26735 to 26955
Band D - Legal 40 Channel CB - "Mid Band" or "CEPT", "EU" or "EC" band 26965-27405
Band E - "High Band" or "Uppers" 27415-27855 - Lots of SSB and AM activity on this portion.  5 kHz steps for SSB
Band F - "Super-High" 27865-28305.  Only the first 11 channels of this band are below 27995 kHz.  The rest are in 10 meters.

--begin "super band" 25615-26055--
25645 AM - Spanish language YL taxi dispatcher, with elaborate roger beeps
25735 AM - Spanish language, probably taxis (roger beeps heard).  Severe fading
25805 AM - Spanish language, YL heard - possibly taxis
25835 AM - Weak AM carrier here. This is CB channel 19 (27185) "down three bands" (27185 - 450 - 450 - 450 = 25835).  Truckers have been heard here before
26055 AM - Spanish language, heavy fading, roger beeps heard
26135 AM - Spanish language
26225 USB - Spanish language [similar to 26555 LSB, 27455 USB, etc
26365 AM - Spanish language, with roger beeps, echo/reverb, etc
26375 AM - Spanish language, several stations heard at once.  Lots of noise toys, sound effects, roger beeps, etc
26475 AM - Spanish language, weak (around S3-S4) but busy
--end "low-low band" 26065-26505--
--begin "low band" 26515-26955--
26540 LSB - Spanish language, Dominican Republic mentioned
26555 LSB - Spanish language [one of many Latin American SSB calling frequencies - see also 27455 USB]
26565 AM - Spanish language
26575 AM - Spanish language
26585 AM - Spanish language, very busy with strong signals [Latin American trucker/AM operator calling channel]
26605 AM - Spanish language, S9 to S9+30 signals with lots of echo
26615 AM - Spanish language.  "La Ciudad de Mexico" (Mexico City) mentioned.  Very punchy and loud S9 signal with reverb/echo
26625 AM - Spanish language
26635 AM - Hearing "Better Off Alone" by Alice Deejay and OM talking in Spanish with way too much echo.  S9 signal LOUD
26645 AM - Spanish language, possibly taxis
26725 AM - Spanish language - YL taxi dispatcher with distinctive roger beep (can hear the taxi drivers she's talking to as well)
26735 AM - English language, truckers discussing traffic, road condx, etc (weak, but readable). Channel 19 "down one band"
26825 AM - Spanish language, heavy fading
26835 AM - English language, Southern US accents, heavy fading
26875 AM - Spanish language, probably taxis
26905 AM - Spanish language - YL taxi dispatcher with single roger beep (S9 signal, very strong nice audio)
26915 AM - English language, Southern US stations [this is known as "36 low" or "915" and is a popular freeband AM frequency]
26955 AM - Hearing roger beeps, can't make out voice traffic, signals right at noise floor
--end "low band" 26515-26955--
--begin "mid band" legal CB band 26965-27405--
26965 AM - Spanish language, single station heard S4-S5 signal.  Noisy channel [CB CH 01]
27005 AM - Spanish language [CB CH 04]
27015 AM - Spanish language, very messy, QRM heterodyne at S9 [CB CH 05]
27025 AM - The Superbowl [CB CH 06]
27035 AM - US truckers mixing in with Spanish language QRM [CB CH 07]
27065 AM - Spanish language [CB CH 09]
27085 AM - Original AM Calling Channel (from the 23-channel CB days).  Active with US stations [CB CH 11]
27115 AM - Very messy and noisy.  Similar to 27185 CB CH 19.  English and Spanish heard, roger beeps, lots of QRM [CB CH 13]
27125 AM - English language, southern accents [CB CH 14]
27175 AM - Spanish language, another messy het, much like 27015 [CB CH 18]
27185 AM - S4 to S5 noise level.  Trucker/Road Channel [CB CH 19]
27195 AM - English language stations heard, likely truckers [R/C Channel - "CH 19A"]
27205 AM - "Bye Bye Bye Bye!" S9+30 LOUD with roger beep on another noisy channel [CB CH 20]
27225 AM - English-speaking stations talking to each other [CB CH 22]
27235 AM - Spanish language - YL taxi dispatcher with roger beep talking to OM taxis [CB CH 24]
27285 AM - English language, Motor Mouth Maul and Mustang Radio Hi-Fi wideband AM audio [CB CH 28]
27335 AM - "You got a copy on 856 down in Clearwater Florida?" [CB CH 33]
27345 AM - YL heard talking.  Sounds like English language but too much QRM to be 100% sure [CB CH 34]
27375 AM - Another messy channel, mostly Spanish language.  High noise floor.  [CB CH 37]
27385 LSB - North American SSB DX Frequency, domestic US stations heard with Spanish YL in the background [CB CH 38]
27405 AM - Spanish language - YL taxi dispatcher (I think) with roger beep.  Lots of noise.  [CB CH 40]
--end "mid band" legal CB band 26965-27405--
--begin "high band" 27415-27855--
27415 AM - Spanish language, heavy fading
27420 LSB - US stations (English language)
27425 LSB - English language. Operators talking about conditions on 40 meters and 20 meters, nice audio, with AM het QRM
27435 USB - Spanish language, weak
27440 LSB - US stations (English language)
27445 LSB - US stations (English language), very strong
27455 USB - Spanish language [one of many Latin American SSB calling frequencies - see also 26555 USB]
27470 USB - Spanish language
27475 USB - Spanish language
27490 LSB - English language, OMs talking about cameras, photography, etc.  Midwestern accents
27495 USB - Spanish language
27505 USB - Spanish language, right at noise floor
27515 AM - Spanish language - YL taxi dispatcher with roger beeps (S7 fading up to S9+ on peaks)
27515 LSB - Knight Patrol CB Club Caribbean SSB Calling Frequency.  Active with stations from Jamaica
27550 USB - Weak voice traffic, unknown language
27555 USB - International Freeband SSB Calling Frequency "T5" "Triple 5" etc.  Only Spanish language heard (for now anyway)
27575 AM - Spanish language
27585 USB - Spanish language
27625 AM - Roger beeps heard in AM mode.  Unknown language, voice traffic is at noise level.  AM het heard in USB/LSB
27665 USB - Spanish language, several stations talking at once
27675 LSB - Spanish language, with heavy OTH Radar QRM
27690 LSB - Spanish language, with "tone burst" roger beep.  Loud signals
27695 USB - Spanish language
27700 USB - Weak SSTV heard
27745 LSB - Spanish language, Mexican accents
27765 USB - Spanish language, with AM het QRM
27765 AM - Spanish language YL taxicab dispatcher fading in and out, fighting the QRM from 27765 USB
27785 AM - Spanish language YL taxicab dispatcher reading numbers.  Heavy fading, but reaching S7 on peaks.  
27815 AM - Spanish language YL taxicab dispatcher with two-tone roger beep, fighting OTH Radar QRM
--end "high band" 27415-27855--
--begin "super high band" or "high-high band" 27865-28305 (up to channel 11A - 27995, the remaining channels are in 10m)--
27865 AM - Spanish language, weak, OMs only heard (usually taxis use YL dispatchers)
27875 AM - Spanish language, possibly truckers
27905 AM - Spanish language, just barely above noise floor, possibly truckers
27950 USB - Some sort of warbling data/digital signal
27985 LSB - Spanish language, roger beeps heard (weak)
--begin 10-meter amateur radio band 28000-29700--
28005 AM - Spanish language, weak but readable, with roger beeps
28030 Strong carrier heard, completely quiets receiver in FM mode...
28065 AM - Spanish language
28085 AM - Spanish language.  Could be truckers as this is CB channel 19 (27185) "up two bands" (27185 + 450 + 450 = 28085)
28135 AM - Spanish language, with roger beeps
28195 AM - Spanish language, weak
28275 AM - Spanish language
« Last Edit: March 04, 2016, 2143 UTC by R4002 »
U.S. East Coast, various HF/VHF/UHF radios/scanners/receivers

Offline MDK2

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Re: 11 meter DX Logs 4 March 2016 1900 UTC +
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2016, 2357 UTC »
Interesting. I'm new to this DXing thing, and I found some of this stuff earlier today. The following is a copying of my notes taken at time of listening. I was scrolling around, wondering if I was hearing the same conversation jumping frequencies, but it looks as if they were all just different ones. Any idea where they're originating? (All frequencies in kHz and all heard in AM mode, all times UTC except where noted.)

3/5 2144 (2:44pm MST) 26525 - strong clear signal of man speaking Spanish. Seems to be a ham. Signal went dead for a few seconds, came back on. Very distant signal now at 2146 - presumably a respondent. Louder respondent at 2148, still weak.
Scrolled up to 26605 at 2150, sounds like same conversation. At 26585 at 2151, strong signal there.
26625 at 2153.
26565 at 2154.
26545 at 2155 with music.
26525 at 2156.
26605 at 2157.
26625 at 2157.
26525 at 2158.
26585 at 2158.
26545 at 2159.
26605 at 2159.
26588 at 2200.
Denver, CO.
SDRPlay RSPdx & RSP2pro, Airspy Discovery HF+, Icom IC-7100, Grundig Satellit 750, Realistic DX-300, Tecsun PL-600.
MLA-30 active loop, G5RV dipole.
eQSLs appreciated wickerjennie at gmail
"Shortwave pirate radio is basically like a very expensive and unreliable way to podcast to a random audience of dozens of people around the world while also worrying that government agents might knock down the door." - Matt Blaze

Offline R4002

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Re: 11 meter DX Logs 4 March 2016 1900 UTC +
« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2016, 1923 UTC »
Most of the traffic you'll hear on the "low channels" - that is, below CB Channel 1 (26965 kHz) comes from Latin America.  26585 is a very active frequency and is used by Mexican truckers.  You can pretty much expect traffic every 10 kHz in the "CB style" frequency steps (26515, 26525, 26535, etc) with some notable exceptions.  The frequency 26555 kHz is often used in LSB mode in Latin American operators (I've often heard Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico and other Caribbean locations on 26555 LSB).  Sometimes the stations on 26555 LSB will QSY to 26540, 26550, 26570, etc.  Otherwise, they follow the channelized 10 kHz step. 

The higher part of this band is where you're more likely to find US-based stations.  26735, 26775, 26815, 26835 and 26915 are the most common ones I've logged.  26955 is also popular.  When the band is really rollin', start at 25615 kHz and move up to 28000.  You'll be surprised how many stations you'll hear in the high part of 25MHz and the lower part of 26MHz.  Taxi companies in Latin America make heavy use of the lower part of the "freeband" and the higher part, sometimes up into 10 meters.  I commonly log taxi dispatchers (almost always female with roger beeps, noise toys and music samples) from 25615 to 26505 in 10 kHz steps and randomly up the band past 28MHz.  25615, 25645, 25685, etc.    I've heard several YL taxi ladies on CB channel 24 (27235) and 40 (27405).  27415, 27445, 27515, 27775, 27805 and 27815 are also commonly heard.

When propagation is very strong, you'll hear traffic every 10 kHz from 25 to 28 MHz, almost always in AM mode below 27 MHz, and a mixture of AM and SSB above 27 MHz.  Don't forget the UK FM CB allocation from 27601.25 to 27991.25.  Things get interesting when there's a Latin American station chatting away on 27605 LSB and an English CBer talking on 27601.25 FM and propagation is favoring them both! 
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Offline MDK2

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Re: 11 meter DX Logs 4 March 2016 1900 UTC +
« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2016, 0202 UTC »
Very cool! Thank you!
Denver, CO.
SDRPlay RSPdx & RSP2pro, Airspy Discovery HF+, Icom IC-7100, Grundig Satellit 750, Realistic DX-300, Tecsun PL-600.
MLA-30 active loop, G5RV dipole.
eQSLs appreciated wickerjennie at gmail
"Shortwave pirate radio is basically like a very expensive and unreliable way to podcast to a random audience of dozens of people around the world while also worrying that government agents might knock down the door." - Matt Blaze