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Topics - ka1iic

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16
Other / Pips network 04/13/2018
« on: April 13, 2018, 2030 UTC »
Found a few pips as follows:

3760,  3820,  3880,  3940,  4000,  4060,  4240,  4300,  4360,  4430,  4500,  4570,  4640,  4710, 4780,  4850,  4920,  4990,  5060,  5140,  5220,  5300,  5380

off at 1954 utc  BTW the pips are approximately 3.7 seconds apart.  I am assuming these are all the same as the SDR in wide band mode show the 'pips' at the  exact same time on every frequency.  I may have missed some :-) 

vgw

17
HF Beacons / Beacon 13563.3 1748 gmt Feb 16 2018
« on: February 16, 2018, 1756 UTC »
beacon on 13563.3 khz very loud signal at 1748gmt it has 1 (one) long beep (dah) and the rest are short beeps (dits)

seems like the longer beeps is part of the device cycle and sometimes  doesn't function the way a person might want it to.  In other words it messes up at times :-)

18
General Radio Discussion / A 'NEW' Bro. Stair ???
« on: January 26, 2018, 1151 UTC »
WWCR 3215 khz AM 0945 UTC 26 Jan 2018

I heard a 'new' voice that was reading Bro. Stairs mail.  The voice was 'younger, but not too young, and seemed a bit more coherent and rational (?) than the original Bro. Stair. But still in the manner of the Southern preacher type person... kinda sorta.

Check the time tho!  Kinda early for me and I could have been dreaming (nightmare) this all was happening.  So lay this report genitals-ly  (heh) on your desk as it may be a big 'boo boo'.I have been known to hear the planet Pluto from time to time. 

If any of you other folks hear the same thing as the report says, then we are all on the same tract :')  Or perhaps you have been using the same 'vitamins' that I have been consuming. If this report is true then we might want to be concerned to the fact this gentltalsman is reading Bro. Stair's mail...  Does he have permission?  Awww what the hell who cares anyway!!!

Now if this is true did Bro, Stair infect the shortwave radio broadcasting system?  Money does do evil things saith Bob!  Money should be re-cycled and made into paper communication cups.  We need communication cups to hold the kool aid so we can wash down that stupid wafer that gets stuck to the roof of thy mouth!!!

And with that I will say, Merry X-day to you all and have a crappy New Year.... wooopie <crash tinkle tinkle thump>.Darn it... I spilled that package of electrons again!!!

<sigh>

19
Peskies / UNKN 15054.5 KHZ 1826 UTC 23 JAN 2018
« on: January 23, 2018, 1825 UTC »
UNKN 15054.5 KHZ 1826 UTC 23 JAN 2018

Spanish speaking with at least two stations in 'rag chew'QSO.

Good signal on a day when over all band conditions are quite poor. 

Off at 1833 utc

20
Has anyone seen a decrease in US Comm. SWBC since Bro. Stair has gone?

Don't get me wrong I sure as hell don't miss the creep but I would feel badly if some of the US stations were to suffer because he has gone.  Hopefully they (the SW stations) have found something or other to fill the gap. 

What say folks!


21
Peskies / SS 2way 15054.5khz usb 1900utc Jan 15 2018
« on: January 15, 2018, 1907 UTC »
SS 2way 15054.5khz usb 1900utc Jan 15 2018. Fair to good signal (S6)
.

22
Shortwave Pirate / UNID 6950 AM 2057 UTC 13 Jan 2018
« on: January 13, 2018, 2057 UTC »
6950khz AM...

They just signed off because no one could hear them!!!!  super strong here in Ohio

23
Shortwave Pirate / UNID 6925 AM 1859 UTC 26 Dec 2017
« on: December 26, 2017, 1915 UTC »
Unkn AM 6925 1912utc 26 Dec 2017

signal just now dropped off @ 1914 utc... Signal has been on and off and  I think it was testing earlier in CW and Carrier....  Something to keep an eye on I guess


24
Propagation / don't look for anything better for a few years...
« on: December 08, 2017, 1752 UTC »
don't look for anything better for a few years...  There won't be any improvement for a number of years...  Unless the Sun explodes and... 8 minutes  until... poof...

Yeah ignore this... I'm just a little angry...  Bad propagation, crappy antennas...  <sigh> it is what it is... sri folks...

25
Utility / OTHR on 6810khz and 7810khz 50khz wide
« on: November 08, 2017, 1522 UTC »
OTHR  6810 khz 1519utc 08 Nov 2017  50 khz wide 
OTHR  7810 khz 1519utc 08 Nov 2017  50 Khz wide

Very strong signal into Troy Ohio moderate selective fading.


26


Researchers find bug in Wi-Fi network encryption


October 19, 2017
by Phoebe Rouge
Technologist, Office of Technology Research and Investigation

If you have a smartphone, laptop, or IoT device connected to a Wi-Fi network, the information you send over that network could be at risk. Researchers recently found a bug that lets attackers break the encryption that protects most wireless networks – leaving data you send exposed.

The bad news is that this is not a problem with a specific device, or even manufacturer – it’s a problem with the WPA2 encryption standard nearly all Wi-Fi devices on the market today use to scramble communications, preventing eavesdropping and tampering. Basically, if you use a device to connect to a wireless network at home, work, or elsewhere, this bug means you cannot rely on that connection being secure.

The good news is that the bug can be fixed with a security update or patch. Device manufacturers and software companies are aware of the bug and updates for affected devices should be rolling out in the near future, if they haven’t already.

In the meantime, connections other than Wi-Fi (like your smartphone’s 4G/3G carrier connection, or a connection with an Ethernet cable) are not affected. So, consider using them instead of Wi-Fi until the updates are available.

Even so, this bug is a reminder that there’s no single solution to secure your data, and all of the other tips for protecting your sensitive information and security online are more important than ever, including:

    Keep up with the latest updates for your software and devices, including updates for your smartphone, computer, and any IoT devices around your home.
    Avoid sending sensitive information over public Wi-Fi, whether or not it’s encrypted.
    When you do send sensitive information to a website, make sure the address starts with “HTTPS” – this will at least ensure the data you send to that one website is encrypted.
    A VPN (Virtual Private Network) app or service can give you another layer of protection for your personal data. VPNs encrypt traffic between your computer and the internet – even on unsecured networks. You can get a personal VPN account from a VPN service provider. If you decide to use one, be aware some VPNs are more secure and easier to use than others, so shop around. Read reviews from several sources, including impartial experts.


https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/blog/2017/10/researchers-find-bug-wi-fi-network-encryption?utm_source=govdelivery

27
Spy Numbers / Cuba HM01 9240khz 0900utc Oct 6 2017
« on: October 06, 2017, 0928 UTC »
Cuba HM01 9240khz 0900utc Oct 6 2017

0927utc second call up.

Fair to good signal wasn't looking for it but I just ran across it while scanning the bands.


28
Strange fast radio bursts that could be 'signals from aliens' are firing off every second in the universe

    Experts had never seen anything like fast radio bursts (FRBs) before 2001
    Some speculate they may be signals sent from intelligent life in the universe
    Harvard experts extrapolated data from one repeating FRB called 121102
    If this is representative of all FRBs then they may be firing every moment

By Tim Collins For Mailonline

Published: 05:38 EDT, 22 September 2017 | Updated: 05:42 EDT, 22 September 2017

location:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4909344/Alien-signal-fast-radio-bursts-firing-second.html

Scientists searching for fast radio bursts that some believe may be signals sent from aliens may be happening every second.

What was once thought to be a rare phenomenon might be occurring each and every moment of the day, experts say.

Fast radio bursts, or FRBs, are radio emissions that appear temporarily and randomly, making them not only hard to find, but also hard to study.

The mystery stems from the fact it is not known what could produce such a short and sharp burst.

If the mysterious phenomena is indeed a sign of intelligent life in the universe, the latest findings could suggest it is far more widespread than previously thought.
Scientists searching for fast radio bursts (FRBs) that some believe may be signals sent from aliens may be happening every second. The blue points in this artist's impression of the filamentary structure of galaxies that extends across the entire sky are signals from FRBs
+3

Scientists searching for fast radio bursts (FRBs) that some believe may be signals sent from aliens may be happening every second. The blue points in this artist's impression of the filamentary structure of galaxies that extends across the entire sky are signals from FRBs
FAST RADIO BURSTS

Fast radio bursts, or FRBs, are radio emissions that appear temporarily and randomly, making them not only hard to find, but also hard to study.

The mystery stems from the fact it is not known what could produce such a short and sharp burst.

This has led some to speculate they could be anything from stars colliding to artificially created messages.

The first FRB was spotted, or rather 'heard' by radio telescopes, back in 2007.

But it was so temporary and seemingly random that it took years for astronomers to agree it wasn't a glitch in one of the telescope's instruments.

Researchers from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CFA) have estimated how many Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) should occur over the entire observable universe.

Their work indicates that at least one FRB is going off somewhere every second.

When fast radio bursts (FRBs), were first detected in 2001, astronomers had never seen anything like them before.

Since then, they have found a couple of dozen FRBs, but they still don't know what causes these rapid and powerful bursts of radio emission.

Anastasia Fialkov of the CFA, who led the study, said: 'If we are right about such a high rate of FRBs happening at any given time, you can imagine the sky is filled with flashes like paparazzi taking photos of a celebrity.

'Instead of the light we can see with our eyes, these flashes come in radio waves.

'In the time it takes you to drink a cup of coffee, hundreds of FRBs may have gone off somewhere in the Universe,' added study co-author Avi Loeb.

'If we can study even a fraction of those well enough, we should be able to unravel their origin.'

To make their estimate, the scientists assumed that FRB 121102, a fast radio burst located in a galaxy about three billion light years away, is representative of all FRBs.

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If the mysterious phenomena is indeed a sign of intelligent life in the universe, it could suggest it is far more widespread than previously thought. Data from the FRB 121102 was gathered using the Green Bank Telescope (pictured)
+3

If the mysterious phenomena is indeed a sign of intelligent life in the universe, it could suggest it is far more widespread than previously thought. Data from the FRB 121102 was gathered using the Green Bank Telescope (pictured)
WHY STUDY FRBS?

The Harvard team point out that FRBs can be used to study the structure and evolution of the Universe whether or not their origin is fully understood.

A large population of faraway FRBs could act as probes of material across gigantic distances.

This intervening material blurs the signal from the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the left over radiation from the Big Bang.

A careful study of this intervening material should give an improved understanding of basic cosmic constituents, such as the relative amounts of ordinary matter, dark matter and dark energy, which affect how rapidly the universe is expanding.

FRBs can also be used to trace what broke down the 'fog' of hydrogen atoms that pervaded the early universe into free electrons and protons, when temperatures cooled down after the Big Bang.

Because this FRB has produced repeated bursts since its discovery in 2002, astronomers have been able to study it in much more detail than other FRBs.

Using that information, they projected how many FRBs would exist across the entire sky.

While their exact nature is still unknown, most scientists think FRBs originate in galaxies billions of light years away.

One leading idea is that FRBs are the byproducts of young, rapidly spinning neutron stars with extraordinarily strong magnetic fields.

Fialkov and Loeb point out that FRBs can be used to study the structure and evolution of the Universe whether or not their origin is fully understood.

A large population of faraway FRBs could act as probes of material across gigantic distances.

This intervening material blurs the signal from the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the left over radiation from the Big Bang.

A careful study of this intervening material should give an improved understanding of basic cosmic constituents, such as the relative amounts of ordinary matter, dark matter and dark energy, which affect how rapidly the universe is expanding.
While their exact nature is still unknown, most scientists think FRBs originate in galaxies billions of light years away. One leading idea is that FRBs are the byproducts of young, rapidly spinning neutron stars with extraordinarily strong magnetic fields (artist's impression)
+3

While their exact nature is still unknown, most scientists think FRBs originate in galaxies billions of light years away. One leading idea is that FRBs are the byproducts of young, rapidly spinning neutron stars with extraordinarily strong magnetic fields (artist's impression)

FRBs can also be used to trace what broke down the 'fog' of hydrogen atoms that pervaded the early universe into free electrons and protons, when temperatures cooled down after the Big Bang.

It is generally thought that ultraviolet (UV) light from the first stars traveled outwards to ionize the hydrogen gas, clearing the fog and allowing this UV light to escape.

Studying very distant FRBs will allow scientists to study where, when and how this process of 'reionization' occurred.

'FRBs are like incredibly powerful flashlights that we think can penetrate thise fog and be seen over vast distances,' added Dr Fialkov.

'This could allow us to study the 'dawn' of the universe in a new way.'

 The full findings of the study were published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4909344/Alien-signal-fast-radio-bursts-firing-second.html#ixzz4tQCO7H2f
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

29
Abstract

Beneficial effects of noise on higher cognition have recently attracted attention. Hypothesizing an involvement of the mesolimbic dopamine system and its functional interactions with cortical areas, the current study aimed to demonstrate a facilitation of dopamine-dependent attentional and mnemonic functions by externally applying white noise in five behavioral experiments including a total sample of 167 healthy human subjects. During working memory, acoustic white noise impaired accuracy when presented during the maintenance period (Experiments 1–3). In a reward based long-term memory task, white noise accelerated perceptual judgments for scene images during encoding but left subsequent recognition memory unaffected (Experiment 4). In a modified Posner task (Experiment 5), the benefit due to white noise in attentional orienting correlated weakly with reward dependence, a personality trait that has been associated with the dopaminergic system. These results suggest that white noise has no general effect on cognitive functions. Instead, they indicate differential effects on perception and cognition depending on a variety of factors such as task demands and timing of white noise presentation.

Keywords: stochastic resonance, stochastic facilitation, dopamine, memory, attention

For more go to:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4630540/

30
HF Beacons / pip 6550 khz 1350 UTC 07/26/2017
« on: July 26, 2017, 1357 UTC »
pip 6550 khz 1350 UTC 07/26/2017

Putting in a very good signal here in Troy,0-hi-0
Don't know anything about this, I just happened across it when scanning the bands.

73
vgw

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