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Messages - KaySeeks

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31
European Pirate / Re: King Shortwave 6210 AM 0835 utc 08 Nov 2020
« on: November 08, 2020, 0848 UTC »
Very good reception on an SDR in Eire, SINPO 42444. the '2' for interference is due to peskie QRM on the USB.

32
European Pirate / Re: Radio 319 6375 AM 0831 utc 08 Nov 2020
« on: November 08, 2020, 0843 UTC »
Very good on an SDR in Eire. SINPO 42434, with some digital QRM in the background. Bee Gees at 0840 UTC, ID at 0845 UTC.

33
European Pirate / Radio Merlin Int. 6305 AM 0730 utc 08 Nov 2020
« on: November 08, 2020, 0741 UTC »
SINPO 33232 on an SDR in Norway. Momentary deep fades below the noise floor. For what it's worth, this SDR has them on 6305.06 KHz.

0738 - ID and email address.

34
European Pirate / Laser Hot Hits 6205 AM 0730 utc 08 Nov 2020
« on: November 08, 2020, 0736 UTC »
Fair signal on an SDR in Norway. SINPO 34323.

0733 - Green Day, "Wake Me Up When September Ends".

36
When looking at the pirate radio logs here as well as the list... https://www.hfunderground.com/wiki/List_of_Pirate_Radio_Frequencies

You can see there is nothing noted in this range. I can understand why much higher frequencies are not used cause they are not very reliable. But in this range, I would expect easier antenna installation with a higher efficiency at lower heights. Also much shorter for smaller lots and increased daytime range. Maybe the doughnut is too big (bad local)? By doughnut, I mean the empty area between the groundwave and the skip zone. Is there just no space for it? I don't know this band too well.

Propagation conditions are generally just not amenable for low-power transmitters at those frequencies now nor in the last few years. As the sunspot number generally increase over the coming 3-5 years, there will be more and more periods where the conditions will be better for such things.

Do some reading on shortwave propagation to understand this.

37

So this would not look at, for example, the Okinawan diet, which certainly consumes quite a bit of fish protein but also rice as a source of carbohydrate.

RE Okinawa and the "blue zones, it seems to be more wishful thinking / fantasy vs reality:

https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/704080v1

Supercentenarians and the oldest-old are concentrated into regions with no birth certificates and short lifespans


Quote
The observation of individuals attaining remarkable ages, and their concentration into geographic sub-regions or ‘blue zones’, has generated considerable scientific interest. Proposed drivers of remarkable longevity include high vegetable intake, strong social connections, and genetic markers. Here, we reveal new predictors of remarkable longevity and ‘supercentenarian’ status. In the United States, supercentenarian status is predicted by the absence of vital registration. The state-specific introduction of birth certificates is associated with a 69-82% fall in the number of supercentenarian records. In Italy, which has more uniform vital registration, remarkable longevity is instead predicted by low per capita incomes and a short life expectancy. Finally, the designated ‘blue zones’ of Sardinia, Okinawa, and Ikaria corresponded to regions with low incomes, low literacy, high crime rate and short life expectancy relative to their national average. As such, relative poverty and short lifespan constitute unexpected predictors of centenarian and supercentenarian status, and support a primary role of fraud and error in generating remarkable human age records.

I had some time to look at the paper. I have a background in applied statistics, but not related to health or bio-statistics, so I get their approach and it looks solid to me.

If true, and I think that in general their methods are probably sound, it shows the risks and dangers of basing conclusions upon outliers (the "supercentinarians") as opposed to the general main body of data, in this case, that would be the general population of these "blue zones". I have a feeling (unproven) that what has been going on is that someone identified some regions of the world as having a lot of outliers to the longevity norms. The ever-cautious scientists said, "we need to study these regions and individuals more before we draw conclusions", but the people who are less scrupulous and make paid TV adverts for a living jumped ahead and made an industry out of promoting them, garnering a lot of flashy attention. This paper, if upheld, would fall into the the former category, the normal workload of validating the observations, as ever-cautious scientists would do. Not sexy but necessary.

38

So this would not look at, for example, the Okinawan diet, which certainly consumes quite a bit of fish protein but also rice as a source of carbohydrate.

RE Okinawa and the "blue zones, it seems to be more wishful thinking / fantasy vs reality:

https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/704080v1

Supercentenarians and the oldest-old are concentrated into regions with no birth certificates and short lifespans


Quote
The observation of individuals attaining remarkable ages, and their concentration into geographic sub-regions or ‘blue zones’, has generated considerable scientific interest. Proposed drivers of remarkable longevity include high vegetable intake, strong social connections, and genetic markers. Here, we reveal new predictors of remarkable longevity and ‘supercentenarian’ status. In the United States, supercentenarian status is predicted by the absence of vital registration. The state-specific introduction of birth certificates is associated with a 69-82% fall in the number of supercentenarian records. In Italy, which has more uniform vital registration, remarkable longevity is instead predicted by low per capita incomes and a short life expectancy. Finally, the designated ‘blue zones’ of Sardinia, Okinawa, and Ikaria corresponded to regions with low incomes, low literacy, high crime rate and short life expectancy relative to their national average. As such, relative poverty and short lifespan constitute unexpected predictors of centenarian and supercentenarian status, and support a primary role of fraud and error in generating remarkable human age records.

This is pre-print, so it is unclear (at least to me) whether this conclusion has been peer-reviewed. Let's see if it survives the peer-review process.

Also, longevity and risks of various diseases have some overlap, obviously, but if we take the allegedly-fraudulent people out of the equation, what are the remaining observations of the general population of the blue zones?

39

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3544045/
CONCLUSION: Dietary fiber intake can obviously increase stool frequency in patients with constipation. It does not obviously improve stool consistency, treatment success, laxative use and painful defecation.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3435786/
CONCLUSION: Idiopathic constipation and its associated symptoms can be effectively reduced by stopping or even lowering the intake of dietary fiber.

I can speak from my personal experience that reducing / nearly eliminating fiber intake also eliminated frequent constipation.  It's entirely possible of course that different people behave differently and some subsegment of the population benefits. But clearly fiber is not a requirement for everyone to prevent constipation.

I'm glad that you figured out what helps you.

Everyone has a different level of "necessary". Not everyone suffers from idiopathic constipation too. If that were the case then there would not be the broad guidelines based upon quantities of human studies and the anecdotal evidence, that in general, fiber is, to some degree or another, useful for most people.

40
I may have posted some links here previously. As with most things regarding nutrition... it's complicated  :)

I was unable to find any of your links on here so if you wish to share a link, please do.

Those of us that are older need the help of fiber for proper "waste removal". ;) Anecdotally, I can tell you that for me, nothing comes close to the effects of dietary fibre in this regard.  :)

Also, correlation of low fibre intake with incidence of intestinal cancer has been established.

41

http://journals.co-action.net/index.php/fnr/article/view/31694

Link is dead. Do you have the title? If so, we might be able to find it that way.

an epidemiological comparison of 42 European countries

So this would not look at, for example, the Okinawan diet, which certainly consumes quite a bit of fish protein but also rice as a source of carbohydrate.

42
My big problem with this video is right here: https://youtu.be/MxW-JKLeu1k?t=258

No one that I am paying attention to is telling anyone to consume more processed plant foods. In fact, the opposite. These things were pushed in the past as cheap substitutes for real food but people have wised up.  Less processing is much more prevalent now. So because the corn industry pushed to have corn syrup put in everything decades ago and to then make the leap that therefore all plant-based food is weak is out of touch with current reality.

In regaling us with bioavailability info, the presenter neglected things like fiber. Good luck finding a meat that has a better fiber content than a plant-based food.

43
What changed in the 1970s? The misguided attempt to reduce heart disease by telling people to cut their fat intake and eat more carbohydrates (and therefore sugar, both directly and in the form of carbs that your body converts into sugar). The same photos and films will show one of the major causes of the increase in heart disease back then - smoking. We've fortunately reduced smoking rates, but unfortunately replaced it with high sugar intake, which also leads to heart disease.

You're not wrong about the old photos, the lower BMIs, and smoking.

I would suggest, however, to not neglect the effects of a much more passive lifestyle, the fewer and fewer % of the population involved in labour-intensive industries like agriculture as the late 19th century moved into the early half of the century. In North America anyway, significantly larger food portion sizes that have become the norm and significantly more time is spent in motor vehicles on a daily basis as well.

44
European Pirate / Re: Radio Pandora 6290 AM
« on: May 30, 2020, 1656 UTC »
I noted him a few minutes ago and went on to other things but now I am back. SINPO 34333 on an SDR in Denmark.

I recognize the announcer's voice and little chuckle as the same announcer as The Ghoul, I think. WRONG!

1659 - ID and email address. Radio Pandora
1705 - Replay of US NPR interview of Johnny Walker on the death of the founder of Radio Caroline. Audio interruption for about a minute in the middle.
1712 - Tracy Chapman

45
As is frequently the case lately, there is another carrier at roughly the same signal strength a few Hertz from Radio Merlin's carrier frequency. The resulting beat frequency note makes the listening not very pleasurable.

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